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Chief Logistics Specialist Abraham Guiterrez, from El Paso, Texas, reenlists with Lt. Jared Sweetser, from Sarasota, Fla., during a replenishment-at-sea on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), March 22, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)
Chief Logistics Specialist Abraham Guiterrez, from El Paso, Texas, reenlists with Lt. Jared Sweetser, from Sarasota, Fla., during a replenishment-at-sea on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), March 22, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)

Navy Creates Better Reenlistment Process Through Career Navigator

Earlier this month, we previewed changes to the way Sailors manage their careers. Today, we want to update you about the Career Navigator Program, our new enlisted career management program. The entire career management process continuum has been reviewed and improved in several areas.

Chief Logistics Specialist Abraham Guiterrez, from El Paso, Texas, reenlists with Lt. Jared Sweetser, from Sarasota, Fla., during a replenishment-at-sea on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), March 22, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)
Chief Logistics Specialist Abraham Guiterrez, from El Paso, Texas, reenlists with Lt. Jared Sweetser, from Sarasota, Fla., during a replenishment-at-sea on the flight deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), March 22, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)

 

These are the five things every Sailor needs to know about the transition from Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, fleet master chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education.

What is Career Navigator?

The Career Navigator Program will organize Navy enlisted career management policies and processes and multiple IT support systems into one comprehensive program. It will unify all career management processes for all career events such as reenlisting, changing rates, choosing orders and transitioning between Active Component and Reserve Component (and back again).

How will Career Navigator work?

Career Navigator will give Sailors the tools they need to directly access information to make informed decisions at key waypoints in their career. While the goal is to have Sailors take the helm and chart the course for their own careers, Career Navigator doesn’t remove a career counselor’s role of assisting Sailors in making decisions. By the end of the year, Sailors will have access to the Career Waypoints system so they can monitor their own information, career opportunities and applications.

What’s happening to Perform to Serve?

The Navy has created a better reenlistment process for Sailors through Career Navigator. We’re simplifying the process and providing information sooner so Sailors can be more actively involved in managing their careers.

What’s different under the Career Navigator Program?

Sailors will now check-in with their career counselors 13 months before the end of their enlistment contract – one month earlier than before – to indicate their intentions to reenlist or separate. Sailors can still change their minds after this initial check-in. We encourage Sailors to let their career counselors know as soon as possible.

How will these changes affect reenlistment?

All eligible and command-approved E-6 Sailors will be approved for reenlistment on their first application. While there is still a need to tell the career counselor your intentions, if you desire to reenlist and have command approval to do so, you will be given reenlistment approval on your first application.

Eligible and command-approved E-5 and below Sailors will receive answers about reenlistment requests earlier. 100 percent of eligible Sailors in skillsets that are open and undermanned will receive approval to reenlist on their first application. They will know the outcome of their request within approximately 30 days.

Sailors who are in skillsets that are balanced, competitive or overmanned, or that have special requirements such as the nuclear community, will receive information sooner about their ability to reenlist in rate, convert to a different rate or transition to the Reserve Component.

With this new design, approximately 75 percent of Sailors who request reenlistment will receive approval on their first application. All Sailors will know at least 10 months from the end of their contract whether they will be able to reenlist in their current rate.

What do you think about these changes?

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