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Army-Navy 2018 Football Game

The G.O.A.T.: Fighting to remain greatest Navy of all time

U.S. Naval Academy football uniform for 2019 Army-Navy Game.
U.S. Naval Academy football uniform for 2019 Army-Navy Game.

When the U.S. Naval Academy football team takes on West Point’s Black Knights for the 2018 Army-Navy Game, the midshipmen will be wearing a uniform that honors their rivalry and draws on an emblem of pride – Bill the Goat, USNA’s mascot.

So, for this 119th playing of America’s Game, we’re showing our pride in the Greatest Navy Of All Time with the hashtag #GOAT, which is shorthand for the Greatest OAll Time on social media. Get it?

We are America’s primary forward deployed force. Diverse, united and tough, we are and will remain the most lethal global maneuver force in the world. As great power competitors threaten the global commons, we will rise to deter and defeat those challenges, protect the American homeland and protect our economic prosperity by keeping the arteries of commerce open on the world’s interconnected oceans. As Sailors, forged by the sea, we will continue to be the Navy the Nation Needs above the sea, on the sea and beneath the sea.

Aviation

Ships attached to the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group and John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group transit the Philippine Sea during dual carrier operations, Nov. 16, 2018. Ronald Reagan and John C. Stennis were underway conducting operations in international waters as part of a dual carrier strike force exercise. The U.S. Navy has patrolled the Indo-Pacific region routinely for more than 70 years promoting regional security, stability and prosperity. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kaila V. Peters/Released)
Ships attached to the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group and John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group transit the Philippine Sea during dual carrier operations, Nov. 16, 2018. Ronald Reagan and John C. Stennis were underway conducting operations in international waters as part of a dual carrier strike force exercise. The U.S. Navy has patrolled the Indo-Pacific region routinely for more than 70 years promoting regional security, stability and prosperity. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kaila V. Peters/Released)

 

Sailors assigned to the Fighting Checkmates of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211, remove ordnance from an F/A-18F Super Hornet on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 15, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maxwell Higgins/Released)
Sailors assigned to the Fighting Checkmates of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211, remove ordnance from an F/A-18F Super Hornet on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 15, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Maxwell Higgins/Released)

For 107 years, American naval aviators have taken flight. Flying off of aircraft carriers, surface ships and shore installations, naval aircraft provide power projection, striking targets on land, the ocean’s surface and below it. Naval aviation also provides critical maritime domain awareness, and the ability to conduct humanitarian assistance anywhere in the world.

No other weapons system in existence or on the drawing board today can deploy and redeploy with the responsiveness, the endurance, the multi-dimensional might and the inherent battle space awareness of a full sized, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and its air wing. These 100,000-ton vessels can transit 10,000 miles in less than 14 days, maneuver to anywhere within one-half million square miles of ocean in 12 hours and launch and recover aircraft in almost any natural wind conditions.

Our naval air force is the largest and best trained in the world, flying the most technologically advanced aircraft. From the Curtiss Pusher Eugene Ely flew off a ship in 1910 to the F-35 Lightning II today, America has led the way. Beyond the technological superiority, however, it’s our aviator, maintainers and air crewmen who make naval aviation excellent. No nation on Earth can match the professionalism, patriotism and dedication of the men and women of naval aviation. U.S. naval aviators win in combat, and make a difference in the world. When it comes to naval aviation, your Navy is the #GOAT.

Surface

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG 96) launches a Standard Missile (SM) 2 Block IIIA in the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 18. Bainbridge was underway with Norfolk-based cruiser-destroyer (CRUDES) units from Carrier Strike Group 12 conducting a Live Fire With a Purpose (LFWAP) event. LFWAP is a reinvigorated missile exercise program designed to increase fleet lethality and tactical proficiency. It provides the surface warfare enterprise an opportunity to examine the human, system and tactics, techniques and procedure performance with an eye toward rapid increases in tactical proficiency, crew confidence and lethality. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Darcy McAtee/Released)
The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG 96) launches a Standard Missile (SM) 2 Block IIIA in the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 18. Bainbridge was underway with Norfolk-based cruiser-destroyer (CRUDES) units from Carrier Strike Group 12 conducting a Live Fire With a Purpose (LFWAP) event. LFWAP is a reinvigorated missile exercise program designed to increase fleet lethality and tactical proficiency. It provides the surface warfare enterprise an opportunity to examine the human, system and tactics, techniques and procedure performance with an eye toward rapid increases in tactical proficiency, crew confidence and lethality. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Darcy McAtee/Released)

 

An MV-22 Osprey, attached to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 365, prepares to land on the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) during exercise Trident Juncture 2018 in the Norwegian Sea, Nov. 7. Trident Juncture was a NATO-led exercise designed to certify NATO response forces and develop interoperability among participating NATO allied and partner nations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Lyle Wilkie/Released)
An MV-22 Osprey, attached to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 365, prepares to land on the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) during exercise Trident Juncture 2018 in the Norwegian Sea, Nov. 7. Trident Juncture was a NATO-led exercise designed to certify NATO response forces and develop interoperability among participating NATO allied and partner nations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Lyle Wilkie/Released)

The Surface Navy has been the #GOAT since defeating the British navy on the world’s oceans to play a leading role in winning our nation’s independence. We began with six frigates, which helped establish America’s enduring role as a maritime nation. And a maritime nation needs a strong maritime force.

Over the course of more than 240 years, the surface fleet played a critical role in protecting America whether keeping challengers off of our beaches to landing our forces on foreign shores to defeat an enemy. We were there for America at Tripoli, the Philippine Sea, Okinawa, Normandy, Arabian Gulf and South China Sea. Underway and under fire, we provided a mobile and lethal surface force to fight and win.

Everything from amphibious assault ships to destroyers provide our nation and our partner nations an afloat fighting force that is second to none.

Undersea

Multinational special operations forces participate in a submarine insertion exercise with the fast-attack submarine USS Hawaii (SSN 776) and combat rubber raiding craft off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise, July 9, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)
Multinational special operations forces participate in a submarine insertion exercise with the fast-attack submarine USS Hawaii (SSN 776) and combat rubber raiding craft off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise, July 9, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Hinton/Released)

 

The Submarine Force and its supporting organizations constitute the primary undersea capability of the U.S. Navy. The mission of the U.S. Submarine Force is to execute the task of the Navy in and from the undersea domain. In addition to lending added capacity to naval forces, the Submarine Force in particular leverages special advantages that come with undersea concealment to permit operational, deterrent and combat effects that the Navy and the nation could not otherwise achieve.

An unarmed Trident II D5 missile launches from the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) off the coast of California, March 26, 2008. The test launch was part of the U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Program’s demonstration and shakedown operation certification process. The successful launch certified the readiness of an SSBN crew and the operational performance of the submarine’s strategic weapons system before returning to operational availability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ronald Gutridge/Released)
An unarmed Trident II D5 missile launches from the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Nebraska (SSBN 739) off the coast of California, March 26, 2008. The test launch was part of the U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Program’s demonstration and shakedown operation certification process. The successful launch certified the readiness of an SSBN crew and the operational performance of the submarine’s strategic weapons system before returning to operational availability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ronald Gutridge/Released)

As an agile force we are charged by the nation with exploiting unique undersea advantages to provide U.S. influence, far forward where other forces cannot complete the mission and where undersea concealment provides unique access. We use undersea concealment to provide unique intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance in support of U.S. national interests in today’s unstable international environment. We use this undersea advantage to provide a survivable strategic deterrent and a robust capability that deters both nuclear and conventional conflict. Finally, if necessary, we use our undersea advantage to strike targets, conduct theater and unit-level anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare, and perform other warfighting missions across multiple domains.

These effects may be delivered within the undersea domain or across domain boundaries; they may be delivered from submarines far-forward or in broad ocean areas; they may be the result of carefully coordinated operations with other forces or achieved by independent operations; and they may be accomplished in peacetime, a time of tension, or during conflict.

Beneath the sea, on the sea and above the sea, we’re fighting each and every minute to get better to remain the greatest Navy of all time; our competitors are focused on taking the lead.

Whether on the football field or on deployment, Go Navy!

Get ready for the game by watching this playlist of Go Navy, Beat Army spirit videos. Tell us what video is your favorite in the comments below.

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