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The official crest of the Virginia-class fast attack submarine USS Indiana (SSN 789). (U.S. Navy graphic/Released)
The official crest of the Virginia-class fast attack submarine USS Indiana (SSN 789). (U.S. Navy graphic/Released)

USS Indiana (SSN 789) Commissioning

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The newest Virginia-class attack submarine, USS Indiana (SSN 789), will be commissioned at Port Canaveral, Florida, Sept. 29, 2018. It will be the 16th Virginia-class attack submarine to join the fleet.

As the most modern and sophisticated attack submarine in the world, the submarine can operate in both littoral and deep ocean environments and presents combatant commanders with a broad and unique range of operational capabilities. Indiana is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, delivery of Special Operations Forces (SOF), strike warfare, irregular warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and mine warfare.

Indiana is a part of the Virginia-class’ third, or Block III, contract, in which the Navy redesigned approximately 20 percent of the ship to reduce acquisition costs. Indiana features a redesigned bow, which replaces 12 individual Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes with two large-diameter Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs) each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles, among other design changes that reduced the submarines’ acquisition cost while maintaining their outstanding warfighting capabilities.

WASHINGTON (June 21, 2012) An artist rendering of the Virginia-class submarine USS Indiana (SSN 789). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Stan Bailey/Released)
WASHINGTON (June 21, 2012) An artist rendering of the Virginia-class submarine USS Indiana (SSN 789). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Stan Bailey/Released)

 

Indiana also has special features to support Special Forces, including a reconfigurable torpedo room which can accommodate a large number of personnel and all their equipment for prolonged deployments and future off-board payloads. Also, in Virginia-class SSNs, traditional periscopes have been replaced by two photonics masts that host visible and infrared digital cameras atop telescoping arms, which are maneuvered by a video game controller. Through the extensive use of modular construction, open architecture and commercial off-the-shelf components, the Virginia class is designed to remain at the cutting edge for its entire operational life through the rapid introduction of new systems and payloads.

SSN-789, which was built at Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Virginia, will be 7,800-tons and 377 feet in length, have a beam of 34 feet and operate at more than 25 knots submerged. It is designed with a reactor plant that will not require refueling during the planned life of the boat, reducing lifecycle costs while increasing underway time.

Diane Kerr Donald, wife of retired Navy submariner Adm. Kirkland Donald, is the ship’s sponsor. Diane was a long serving member of the Submarine Force spouse organizations. She actively supported, organized and ran charity events and projects to raise funds for the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and other organizations. In 2003, Diane served as President of Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and continued her passionate leadership of an organization dedicated to funding and awarding college scholarships for children of submariners. In following years, she continued as an advocate for Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and the Submarine Force at large, and as a strong supporter for the civilians and Sailors of Naval Reactors.

Ship's Sponsor Diane Donald christens the Virginia-class submarine Indiana (SSN 789), witnessed by (from left) Vice President Mike Pence, Indiana's Commanding Officer, Cdr. Jesse Zimbauer and Newport News Shipbuilding President Matt Mulherin in Newport News, Virginia, April 29, 2017. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy Huntington Ingalls Industries by Ashley Major/Released)
Ship’s Sponsor Diane Donald christens the Virginia-class submarine Indiana (SSN 789), witnessed by (from left) Vice President Mike Pence, Indiana’s Commanding Officer, Cdr. Jesse Zimbauer and Newport News Shipbuilding President Matt Mulherin in Newport News, Virginia, April 29, 2017. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy Huntington Ingalls Industries by Ashley Major/Released)

 

The submarine Indiana will be the fourth planned, and third commissioned U.S. Navy vessel to bear the Indiana name.

It is the first not designed as a heavy battleship. The first USS Indiana (BB 1) first served from 1895-1903, most notably as part of the naval blockade of Santiago Harbor in the Spanish-American War. It was recommissioned from 1906-1914, and again from 1917-1919 primarily as a training platform. The keel for a planned Indiana (BB 50) was laid down in 1920, but construction was halted due to the terms of the Washington Treaty for Naval Limitation following World War I, and it was never commissioned.

USS Indiana (BB 58) was laid in 1939 and launched Nov. 20, 1941, weeks before the attack on Pearl Harbor. With work accelerated, the ship commissioned on April 30, 1942, and deployed for the war in the Pacific in November – less than a year after it was launched. A massive South Dakota-class battleship, USS Indiana played a key role in almost every U.S. naval engagement after its arrival. BB-58 earned the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with nine battle stars, the World War II Victory Medal, Navy Occupation Medal with “ASIA” clasp, and the Philippine Liberation Medal with two stars. BB-58’s major campaigns in the Pacific included the Gilbert Islands Campaign, Marshall Islands Campaign, Mariana Islands Campaign and the Great Turkey Shoot, Battle of Iwo Jima, Okinawa Campaign and Preparations for Invasion of Japan. Following Japan’s surrender, Indiana was the first major combatant to return to the U.S., and the last of its class of battleships to be decommissioned in 1947.

For media interested in attending the Media Day (Sept. 27) and/or commissioning ceremony (Sept. 29), contact the Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairs office at 321-853-1298, or via email at USFF_COMSUBLANT_NFLT_PAO@navy.mil by noon, Monday, Sept. 24.

No live trucks or vans will be authorized.

Media who are not able to attend the Media Day or Ceremony may request remote interviews with Indiana leadership and crew.

10 Things to Know About USS Indiana (SSN 789)

  1. USS Indiana (SSN 789) is the third ship to be named for the State of Indiana. The first was USS Indiana (BB 1), a battle ship that participated in the Spanish – American War. The second was USS Indiana (BB 58), a battle ship that fought in World War II and earned nine battle stars.
  2. Fourteen Sailors from USS Indiana (BB 58) attended the christening of the current Indiana. Two of the Sailors in the group were plank owners of BB-58 when it was built in the Newport News Shipyard – the same shipyard that built SSN-789.
  3. The ship’s crest depicts various symbols of the Submarine Force and the state of Indiana. It is framed by a gold outline of the state and at the top of the crest there is a torch with stars that are symbols from the state flag. The torch represents liberty and enlightenment; the rays surrounding the torch represent their far-reaching influence. There are nine silver stars on the crest around the torch. These represent the nine battle stars that USS Indiana (BB 58) earned during World War II. The ship’s name and a depiction of the submarine are below the torch. At the bottom of the crest are two ship profiles. These are the silhouettes of the two previous ships to bear the name Indiana. Below the silhouettes are two submarine dolphins, framing a set of gears on the right and a shock of wheat on the left with “SSN 789” in the center. The dolphins are symbols of the Submarine Force and represent the technical prowess and excellence of its officers and enlisted members. The gears and wheat represent the industry and agriculture native to the state of Indiana. Finally, the background of the crest is a checkered flag which represents the famous racing history and culture of Indiana.
  4.  Indiana had one of the largest christening ceremonies for a submarine to date. The key note speaker was Vice President Mike Pence, the former governor of the state of Indiana and a long-time supporter of the boat and its crew. Following his speech, Pence took time to reenlist two Indiana Sailors and to promote the supply officer from ensign to lieutenant junior grade. He then met with their families before departing the ceremony.
  5. The State of Indiana has a wide ranging manufacturing industry and many of the parts that went into building Indiana were originally made by companies located in its namesake state.
  6. SSN-789 was christened on April 29, 2017. BB-58 was commissioned on April 30, 1942. These two ships came to life almost exactly 75 years apart.
  7. Indiana utilizes an advanced periscope called a photonics mast. The mast contains a camera that allows many tactical advantages when submerged. Indiana is one of the first boats to use a new and improved joystick controller to maneuver this mast rather than the traditional periscope hydraulic column. This frees up space in the control room and allows multiple individuals to see what the scope sees.
  8. The USS Indiana (SSN 789) galley is called the “Brickyard Bistro.” This name is in reference to the racing culture of Indiana, specifically to the finish line at the Indianapolis 500 Motor Speedway which is called the “Brickyard.”
  9. The ship’s motto is “Silent Victors.” The motto comes from a monument to Sailors and veterans in Indianapolis, Indiana. Indianapolis holds more monuments to veterans and/or the armed services than any other city outside of Washington, D.C. This is a physical testimony to the support that Indiana provides to the armed forces of the United States. SSN-789 has certainly felt this support through many visits to the state and opportunities to meet Hoosiers.
  10. Sailors onboard SSN-789 are referred to as Hoosiers – just like Indiana natives. A common phrase heard around the boat when completing a mission, a task or a simple meeting is “Hooyah Hoosiers.” The official chant used by the boat is “Indiana Strong! Hoosier Proud! Hooyah Hoosiers!”

About the Boat

When and where is the commissioning ceremony?
The commissioning ceremony will be held at Port Canaveral, Florida, Sept. 29, 2018.

How many other submarines does the U.S. Navy currently have?
There are currently three classes of SSNs (attack submarines) in service; the Los Angeles, Sea Wolf and Virginia class (50 in total). The Navy also has guided missile submarines and ballistic missile submarines too.

What makes the Virginia class different?
The Virginia-class submarines are better capable to operate in littoral waters. They additionally can be configured to support special operations forces (SOF) by converting a torpedo room into an area for SOF personnel and their equipment. Additionally, diving operations can occur with greater ease due to a large lock-in/lock-out chamber for divers. Block III submarines feature a redesigned bow, which replaces 12 individual launch tubes with two large-diameter Virginia Payload Tubes each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles, among other design changes that reduced the submarines’ acquisition cost while maintaining their outstanding warfighting capabilities.

Where was Indiana constructed?
Virginia-class submarines are built under a joint construction contract between General Dynamics’ Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding. GD Electric Boat and Newport News Shipbuilding are the only two U.S. shipyards capable of building nuclear-powered vessels.

When was the keel laid?
May 16, 2015

When was the ship christened?
April 29, 2017

When did PCU Indiana pass the required inspections by the Navy?
Indiana successfully completed the independent Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) trials, which evaluates the submarine’s seaworthiness and operational capabilities. During INSURV trials, the crew took the submarine to test depth and tested the submarine’s propulsion plant and material readiness. The sub was delivered to the Navy on Sept. 21, 2017.

Who is USS Indiana’s sponsor?
Diane Kerr Donald is a native of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and a proud, lifelong Navy spouse. Joining Navy life when she married her husband, Kirkland Donald, a submarine officer at the height of the Cold War, Diane juggled the demands of family and career along with frequent relocations and separations. Ever busy with work and raising daughter, Diane always found time to support Sailors and their families at every duty station.

Diane was a long-serving member of the Submarine Force spouse organizations. She actively supported, organized and ran charity events and projects to raise funds for the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and other organizations. In 2003, Diane served as president of Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and continued her passionate leadership of an organization dedicated to funding and awarding college scholarships for children of submariners. In following years, she continued as an advocate for Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and the Submarine Force at large, and as a strong supporter for the civilians and Sailors of Naval Reactors.

As an engaged, compassionate, creative and ever supportive Navy spouse, Diane set a worthy example of selfless service and commitment to the Navy and the nation for 37 years.

When was the ship named?
The Secretary of the Navy announced June 25, 2012, that SSN-789, the 16th Virginia-class submarine, would be named after the state of Indiana.

How big is the PCU Indiana?
377 ft. long; 34 ft. wide; approximately 7,800 tons submerged

How fast can the PCU Indiana go?
25+ knots submerged

What history does the USS Indiana name have in the Navy?
The submarine Indiana will be the fourth planned, and third commissioned U.S. Navy vessel to bear the Indiana name. It is the first not designed as a heavy battleship.

  • The first USS Indiana (BB 1) first served from 1895-1903, most notably as part of the naval blockade of Santiago Harbor in the Spanish-American War. It was recommissioned from 1906-1914, and again from 1917-1919 primarily as a training platform.
  • The keel for a planned Indiana (BB 50) was laid down in 1920, but construction was halted due to the terms of the Washington Treaty for Naval Limitation following World War I, and it was never commissioned.
  • USS Indiana (BB 58) was laid in 1939 and launched Nov. 20, 1941, weeks before the attack on Pearl Harbor. With work accelerated, the ship commissioned on April 30, 1942, and deployed for the war in the Pacific in November – less than a year after it was launched. A massive South Dakota-class battleship, USS Indiana played a key role in almost every U.S. naval engagement after its arrival. BB-58 earned the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with nine battle stars, the World War II Victory Medal, Navy Occupation Medal with “ASIA” clasp, and the Philippine Liberation Medal with two stars. Indiana’s major campaigns in the Pacific included the Gilbert Islands Campaign, Marshall Islands Campaign, Mariana Islands Campaign and the Great Turkey Shoot, Battle of Iwo Jima, Okinawa Campaign and Preparations for Invasion of Japan. Following Japan’s surrender, Indiana was the first major combatant to return to the U.S., and the last of its class of battleships to be decommissioned in 1947.

Related Stories

Video

 

PCU Indiana (SSN 789) Control Room Underway

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PCU Indiana (SSN 789) Underway

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PCU Indiana Loads Training Torpedo

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PCU Indiana Sailors Relax Underway and Submarine Warfare Pinning

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Photos

For more photos, visit PCU Indiana’s Flickr account. 

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The bridge team onboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) stands watch and pilots the boat while entering Port Canaveral, Florida, June 22, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
The bridge team onboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) stands watch and pilots the boat while entering Port Canaveral, Florida, June 22, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) stand watch in the control room while underway in the Atlantic Ocean, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) stand watch in the control room while underway in the Atlantic Ocean, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)

 

Cmdr. Jesse Zimbauer, center, commanding officer of Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) observes the review of navigational charts while underway, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released
Cmdr. Jesse Zimbauer, center, commanding officer of Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) observes the review of navigational charts while underway, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released
Fire Control Technician 3rd Class Matthew Baraban, assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789), reviews navigational charts while underway in the Atlantic Ocean, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Fire Control Technician 3rd Class Matthew Baraban, assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789), reviews navigational charts while underway in the Atlantic Ocean, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)

 

Lt. j.g. Leslie Liang performs normal diesel operation checks, verifying pressure, temperature and the operational status of the diesel engines aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789), June 23, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Lt. j.g. Leslie Liang performs normal diesel operation checks, verifying pressure, temperature and the operational status of the diesel engines aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789), June 23, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) perform a systems status check and simulate torpedo launch procedures on the weapons launch console while underway, June 23, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) perform a systems status check and simulate torpedo launch procedures on the weapons launch console while underway, June 23, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)

 

Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) look over reference manuals while conducting operational checks in the diesel engineering spaces, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) look over reference manuals while conducting operational checks in the diesel engineering spaces, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) conduct an inventory check of Emergency Escape Breathing Devices on the crew's mess deck, June 23, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) conduct an inventory check of Emergency Escape Breathing Devices on the crew’s mess deck, June 23, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)

 

Sailors respond to a fire drill onboard the Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789), June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors respond to a fire drill onboard the Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789), June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) eat dinner in the crew’s mess while underway, June 23, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) eat dinner in the crew’s mess while underway, June 23, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)

 

Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) study for their submarine warfare qualification while in the crew’s mess, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) study for their submarine warfare qualification while in the crew’s mess, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Cmdr. Jesse Zimbauer, center, commanding officer of Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) addresses Indiana’s crew after an awards-at-quarters, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Cmdr. Jesse Zimbauer, center, commanding officer of Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) addresses Indiana’s crew after an awards-at-quarters, June 24, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)

For more photos, visit PCU Indiana’s Flickr account. 

 

Biographies

Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Heineman, left; Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jesse Zimbauer, center; and Chief of the Boat ETVCS Charles Simonds, right, stand in front of Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) while pier-side in Port Canaveral, Florida, June 24, 2018. Indiana is the 16th Virginia-class fast attack submarine and is scheduled to be commissioned Sept. 29, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)
Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Heineman, left; Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jesse Zimbauer, center; and Chief of the Boat ETVCS Charles Simonds, right, stand in front of Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) while pier-side in Port Canaveral, Florida, June 24, 2018. Indiana is the 16th Virginia-class fast attack submarine and is scheduled to be commissioned Sept. 29, 2018. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Darryl Wood/Released)

Commanding Officer

Commanding Officer

Capt. Jesse Zimbauer enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1989. After recruit training in San Diego, California, he attended the Defense Language Institute, completing his certification as a Korean linguist. Zimbauer went on to complete certification as a crypto linguist and served in 1st Radio Battalion, FMF PAC, Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. He was selected to participate in the NROTC program and was commissioned at the University of Wisconsin with degrees in Chemical Engineering and Naval Science in May 1997.

His first sea assignment was on USS Georgia (SSBN 729) (G) from September 1998 through October 2001. During this tour, Zimbauer served as CRA, RCA, DCA, assistant weapons officer, and assistant engineer, and completed five strategic deterrent patrols. Following his division officer tour, he served as an assistant professor of Naval Science at the University of Minnesota NROTC program from November 2001 through March 2004. During this tour, he earned his MBA at the Carlson School of Management.

Zimbauer served as navigator on board USS Asheville (SSN 758) from October 2004 to May 2007. During this tour, Asheville completed a Western Pacific deployment and a modernization. Following his Asheville tour, Zimbauer served as the navigator of  USS Helena (SSN 725) from June 2007 through August 2007 before reporting as squadron operations officer at Commander, Submarine Squadron 11 where he served from August 2007 to August 2009.

Zimbauer served as executive officer on board USS Olympia (SSN 717) from August 2009 through September 2011. During this tour, Olympia completed a Western Pacific deployment and won the Battle Efficiency Award. Following his executive officer tour, he served as the flag secretary to Commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet in Yokosuka, Japan from October 2011 through April 2014.

In January 2015, Zimbauer assumed the duties as the first commanding officer of PCU Indiana (SSN 789).

Zimbauer is married with three children. His personal decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal (one gold star), Navy Commendation Medal (four gold stars), and the Navy Achievement Medal (three gold stars).

Executive Officer

Executive Officer

Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Spray is a native of Mt. Vernon, Ohio. He graduated from Miami University in 2005 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Finance. In December 2006, Spray reported to USS Louisiana (SSBN 743), homeported in Bangor, Washington, where he completed five strategic deterrent patrols. He served as engineer on board USS New Mexico (SSN 779), homeported in Groton, Connecticut, from September 2013 to April 2016. During his tour, Spray completed ICEX 2014 and a U.S. European Command deployment. Following his tour on New Mexico, Spray reported to Commander, Submarine Squadron Six in Norfolk, Virginia, where he served as squadron engineer. Spray assumed the duties of executive officer on PCU Indiana (SSN 789) in July 2018.

His other shore tours include Commander, Submarine Group Nine in Banger, Washington, where he served flag aide and he also studied at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.  His awards include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (four awards), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (two awards), and various other unit and personal awards.

Chief of the Boat

Chief of the Boat

ETVCS (SS) Charles Simonds, a native of Clearwater, Florida, enlisted in the U.S. Navy in June 2003. He completed basic training at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Illinois.

Upon completion of basic training, Senior Chief Simonds attended Basic Enlisted Submarine School (BESS) and Navigation Electronics Technician “A” School in Groton, Connecticut.

His at-sea assignments as a navigation electronics technician include USS Miami (SSN 755) and USS Boise

(SSN 764). Ashore, his in-rate assignments include the staff of Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic and the staff of Commander, Submarine Squadron 6.

He attended the Senior Enlisted Academy Resident Course in September 2016 and the Command Master Chief/Chief of the Boat Capstone Course in January 2018 before reporting to PCU Indiana (SSN 789) in May 2018 as chief of the boat.

Simonds is a recipient of the Naval Submarine League Vice Adm. Charles A. Lockwood Award for Operational Excellence and is authorized to wear numerous personal awards. He is most proud of the five Battle “E” awards and the other unit awards earned alongside his shipmates.

Ship's Sponsor

Ship's Sponsor

Diane Kerr McDonald, wife of retired Navy submariner Adm. Kirkland Donald, is the ship’s sponsor. Diane was a long serving member of the Submarine Force spouse organizations. She actively supported, organized and ran charity events and projects to raise funds for the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and other organizations. In 2003, Diane served as President of Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and continued her passionate leadership of an organization dedicated to funding and awarding college scholarships for children of submariners. In following years, she continued as an advocate for Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and the Submarine Force at large, and as a strong supporter for the civilians and Sailors of Naval Reactors.

Boat’s Crest

WASHINGTON (April 27, 2017) The official crest of the Virginia-class fast attack submarine USS Indiana (SSN 789). (U.S. Navy graphic/Released)
WASHINGTON (April 27, 2017) The official crest of the Virginia-class fast attack submarine USS Indiana (SSN 789). (U.S. Navy graphic/Released)

 

The ship’s crest depicts various symbols of the Submarine Force and the state of Indiana. It is framed by a gold outline of the state and at the top of the crest there is a torch with stars that are symbols from the state flag. The torch represents liberty and enlightenment; the rays surrounding the torch represent their far-reaching influence. There are nine silver stars on the crest around the torch. These represent the nine battle stars that USS Indiana (BB 58) earned during World War II. The ship’s name and a depiction of the submarine are below the torch. At the bottom of the crest are two ship profiles. These are the silhouettes of the two previous ships to bear the name Indiana. Below the silhouettes are two submarine dolphins, framing a set of gears on the right and a shock of wheat on the left with “SSN 789” in the center. The dolphins are symbols of the Submarine Force and represent the technical prowess and excellence of its officers and enlisted members. The gears and wheat represent the industry and agriculture native to the state of Indiana. Finally, the background of the crest is a checkered flag which represents the famous racing history and culture of Indiana.

History

Evolution of Subs Infographic

The Traditions of Ship Commissionings

Ship Commissionings Infographic

USS Indiana (BB 1)

USS Indiana (BB 50)

USS Indiana (BB 58)

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