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GUAM (March 10, 2016) Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) conducts a live fire of a harpoon missile during Multi-Sail 2016. Multi Sail is a bilateral training exercise aimed at interoperability between the U.S. and Japanese forces. This exercise builds interoperability and benefits from realistic, shared training, enhancing our ability to work together to confront any contingency. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eric Coffer/Released)
GUAM (March 10, 2016) Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) conducts a live fire of a harpoon missile during Multi-Sail 2016. Multi Sail is a bilateral training exercise aimed at interoperability between the U.S. and Japanese forces. This exercise builds interoperability and benefits from realistic, shared training, enhancing our ability to work together to confront any contingency. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eric Coffer/Released)

Integrated Warfare Systems Strengthening Naval Power at and from Sea

By Rear Adm. Jon Hill
Program Executive Officer for Integrated Warfare Systems

In today’s maritime environment, challenges for control of the seas are rapidly ­emerging. To ensure the U.S. Navy maintains our global maritime superiority, we must outpace the threats resident in the arsenals of our adversaries.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 15, 2016) – Guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), left, launches a Standard Missile-2 (SM-2) to destroy an advanced high-speed target while USS Stout (DDG 55) and USS Mason (DDG 87) transit formation during a live-fire test of the ship’s Aegis weapons systems. As the world’s premier fleet-aria air defense weapon, SM-2 is an integral part of the layered defense that protects the world’s naval assets and gives warfighters a greater reach in the battlespace. SM-2 variants are lethal against subsonic, supersonic, low- and high-altitude, high-maneuvering, diving, sea-skimming, anti-ship cruise missiles, fighters, bombers, and helicopters in an advanced electronic countermeasures environment. SM-2 has an extensive area and self-defense flight test history with more than 2,650 successful flight tests from domestic and international ships. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Damage Controlman Andrae L. Johnson/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 15, 2016) – Guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), left, launches a Standard Missile-2 (SM-2) to destroy an advanced high-speed target while USS Stout (DDG 55) and USS Mason (DDG 87) transit formation during a live-fire test of the ship’s Aegis weapons systems. As the world’s premier fleet-aria air defense weapon, SM-2 is an integral part of the layered defense that protects the world’s naval assets and gives warfighters a greater reach in the battlespace. SM-2 variants are lethal against subsonic, supersonic, low- and high-altitude, high-maneuvering, diving, sea-skimming, anti-ship cruise missiles, fighters, bombers, and helicopters in an advanced electronic countermeasures environment. SM-2 has an extensive area and self-defense flight test history with more than 2,650 successful flight tests from domestic and international ships. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Damage Controlman Andrae L. Johnson/Released)

 

ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 15, 2016) – A 1500 Lb. Standard Missile-2 (SM-2) leaps from the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) at twice the speed of sound to destroy an advanced high-speed target while USS Monterey (CG 61), USS Stout (DDG 55) and USS Mason (DDG 87) transit in formation. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Damage Controlman Andrae L. Johnson/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (March 15, 2016) – A 1500 Lb. Standard Missile-2 (SM-2) leaps from the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) at twice the speed of sound to destroy an advanced high-speed target while USS Monterey (CG 61), USS Stout (DDG 55) and USS Mason (DDG 87) transit in formation. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Damage Controlman Andrae L. Johnson/Released)

Last June, the Navy stood up a Distributed Lethality Task Force to define the capabilities and capacity needed across all domains to become a more offensive and dominant Navy. For the Program Executive Office for Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO IWS), delivering distributed lethality will require a system-of-systems engineering approach that addresses the Navy’s near-, mid- and far-term requirements. Simply put, we have to design platforms and combat systems together to maximize interoperability.

To that end, PEO IWS is planning for the future while engineering cost conscience solutions to today’s threats. Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air is one example. By integrating current programs of record and linking advanced sensors and combat systems to long-range weapons, we’re able to increase the offensive battlespace while enhancing the anti-air and anti-surface lethality of our surface fleet.

Another example was the installation and successful live-fire test of the SeaRAM Close-In Weapon System Anti-Ship Missile Defense System on USS Porter (DDG 78) earlier this year. The replacement of the aft Close-In Weapon System aboard a guided missile destroyer with a MK 15 SeaRAM was a rapid and cost effective solution to a critical warfighting requirement. Across a number of commands and organizations, our weapons, ship integration and testing experts coordinated to identify assets, execute critical engineering requirements, deliver equipment, complete system installation and conduct testing on a foreign test range—all in record time, professionally and with the urgency of meeting a critical warfighting need.

As we expand our combat capabilities, our allies look to us for leading edge technol­ogies and battlespace advantage—and this only works to enhance our distributed lethality network. These international relationships form the backbone of a vibrant, interoperable naval power network.

The future of naval combat systems will continue to involve identifying and defeating complex and increasingly sophisticated threats. If the United States is to remain the world’s preeminent power, we have to continue to develop improved capabilities, increase the velocity at which we install those capabilities, diversify our weapons inventories and build our networks to incorporate our allies.

Hear more from Navy leadership on this topic from the Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space panel May 17 in this video below.

 

 

 

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