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An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Sidewinders of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 86 prepares to make an arrested landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the Atlantic Ocean, June 2, 2016. Dwight D. Eisenhower and its Carrier Strike Group (CSG) are deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch/Released)
An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Sidewinders of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 86 prepares to make an arrested landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the Atlantic Ocean, June 2, 2016. Dwight D. Eisenhower and its Carrier Strike Group (CSG) are deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch/Released)

Naval Aviation Vision: A Ready and Superior Warfighting Force

The below Navy Live blog is a modified excerpt from the Naval Aviation Vision, 2016-2025 “Letter from the Leadership of Naval Aviation,” signed by Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker, commander, Naval Air Forces; Lt. Gen. Jon Davis, deputy commandant for Aviation, U.S. Marine Corps; Vice Adm. Paul Grosklags, commander, Naval Air Systems Command; Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, former director, Air Warfare Division, and current deputy chief of naval operations for warfare systems; and Rear Adm. Nancy Norton, director of Warfare Integration for Information Warfare.

Naval Aviation Vision coverToday, we are excited to announce the publication of “Naval Aviation Vision, 2016-2025” a document that presents a unified U.S. Navy and Marine Corps view of how we intend to ensure naval aviation’s warfighting superiority into the future.

Naval aviation forces are forward, engaged and ready—every day. Nuclear-powered aircraft carriers, air wings, expeditionary forces, amphibious forces, manned and unmanned platforms, rotary- and fixed-wing aircraft are on station, valued and in increasingly high demand. It is a national priority to sustain, resource and ultimately expand these capabilities to ensure that when called, naval aviation is ready.

“Naval Aviation Vision, 2016-2025” describes a roadmap for achieving naval aviation wholeness through the pillars of readiness, capability and capacity.

Readiness remains the essential key to our warfighting proficiency. Ready for tasking aircraft and ships and Sailors and Marines fully trained in their missions are the means by which naval aviation will protect and advance our national interests. In a resource-constrained environment, readiness requirements must be well-defined in order to make deliberate and thoughtful choices to ensure all units are combat-ready when required.

An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Sidewinders of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 86 prepares to make an arrested landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the Atlantic Ocean, June 2, 2016. Dwight D. Eisenhower and its Carrier Strike Group (CSG) are deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch/Released)
An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Sidewinders of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 86 prepares to make an arrested landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the Atlantic Ocean, June 2, 2016. Dwight D. Eisenhower and its Carrier Strike Group (CSG) are deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anderson W. Branch/Released)

 

Naval aviation must plan and resource to retain and obtain the capabilities that allow us to achieve global reach and control of the sea and air domains, as well as the electromagnetic spectrum. Naval aviation is leaning forward, transitioning nearly every legacy aircraft to a more capable and technologically advanced platform able to deliver lethal combat and credible non-combat effects across the spectrum of conflict. This strategy is mirrored as well in our carrier and amphibious fleet as we move into the more capable, affordable and survivable Ford-class carriers and the America-class amphibious assault ships. Naval aviation is leveraging the capabilities of multiple systems through integrated warfighting concepts and digital interoperability is enabling us to seamlessly exchange tactically relevant information between units to increase the effectiveness of the force as a whole.

Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona - An F-35B Lightning II with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, based out of Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., performs a vertical landing as part of required flying field carrier landing practices (FCLP) at the station’s auxiliary landing field, Monday, April 27, 2015. The landing field simulates the flight deck of an aircraft carrier to prepare pilots for landing and taking off at sea. (Official Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Travis Gershaneck/Released)
Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona – An F-35B Lightning II with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, based out of Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., performs a vertical landing as part of required flying field carrier landing practices (FCLP) at the station’s auxiliary landing field, Monday, April 27, 2015. The landing field simulates the flight deck of an aircraft carrier to prepare pilots for landing and taking off at sea. (Official Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Travis Gershaneck/Released)

Capacity is the third pillar of our vision. In “Naval Aviation Vision 2016-2025,”we outline naval aviation’s current and projected operational capacity and provide the transformation roadmaps that show how we plan to build that capacity for the future. Despite fiscal pressures, naval aviation is leveraging groundbreaking technologies and implementing ways to deliver new operational capabilities in sufficient numbers.

Readiness based on flight line warfighting requirements, superior capability, wholeness of the fleet and sufficient capacity are naval aviation’s strategic goals. Creating and implementing integrated warfighting capabilities, balancing live, virtual and constructive training and harmonizing readiness sustainment accounts all contribute to optimizing proficiency and are the primary focus of Naval Aviation Enterprise stakeholders. This document describes our vision to maximize limited resources while efficiently fielding tomorrow’s fleet and capitalizing on future technologies.

We encourage you to read Naval Aviation Vision, 2016-2025 and share it with your fellow Sailors and Marines. This vision is intended to help inform and guide your actions, as well as the actions of all those who support Naval Aviation, to ensure our continued success as a ready and superior warfighting force.

 

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