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EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (March 22, 2012) Seaman Apprentice Aaron Gorby, a student at Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School, tapes a fuse prior to removal during a training scenario in the Tools and Methods division. The school provides high-risk, specialized, basic and advanced EOD training to more than 2,200 U.S. and partner nation military and selected U.S. government personnel each year. (U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Elizabeth Allen/Released)
EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (March 22, 2012) Seaman Apprentice Aaron Gorby, a student at Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School, tapes a fuse prior to removal during a training scenario in the Tools and Methods division. The school provides high-risk, specialized, basic and advanced EOD training to more than 2,200 U.S. and partner nation military and selected U.S. government personnel each year. (U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Elizabeth Allen/Released)

Five Things to Know About Navy EOD

Did you know May 7 is National Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Day?

The first Saturday in May honors members of the U.S. military who risk their lives in disposing explosives.

Test your knowledge about our EOD Sailors with these 5 things that you may not know from EOD Groups 1 and 2:

1) Our U.S. Navy explosive ordnance disposal force is the only U.S. force that conducts EOD operations underwater.

JIINHAE-GU, Republic of Korea  (March 30, 2016) U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 2nd Class Kaden Ross, with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5, pilots an IVER3 unmanned underwater vehicle toward his boat off the coast of Jinhae-gu, Republic of Korea (ROK) March 30, 2016 during exercise Foal Eagle 2016. The UUV is being used as part of the exercise to inspect and detect mine-like shapes during mine countermeasures operations. Foal Eagle is an annual, bilateral training exercise designed to enhance the readiness of U.S. and ROK forces, and their ability to work together during a crisis. (U.S. Navy combat camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Charles E. White/Released)
JIINHAE-GU, Republic of Korea (March 30, 2016) U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 2nd Class Kaden Ross, with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5, pilots an IVER3 unmanned underwater vehicle toward his boat off the coast of Jinhae-gu, Republic of Korea (ROK) March 30, 2016 during exercise Foal Eagle 2016. The UUV is being used as part of the exercise to inspect and detect mine-like shapes during mine countermeasures operations. Foal Eagle is an annual, bilateral training exercise designed to enhance the readiness of U.S. and ROK forces, and their ability to work together during a crisis. (U.S. Navy combat camera photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Charles E. White/Released)

2) Navy explosive ordnance disposal is the only Navy community with mine warfare as a community wide core competency in both the officer and enlisted corps.

ARABIAN GULF (Nov. 5, 2013) A rigid-hull inflatable boat containing unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) is pulled from the water aboard forward staging base (Interim) USS Ponce (AFSB(I)-15) during training exercises. Commander, Task Group (CTG) 56.1 conducts mine countermeasure, explosive ordnance disposal, salvage-diving and force protection operations throughout the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas S. Tenorio/Released)
ARABIAN GULF (Nov. 5, 2013) A rigid-hull inflatable boat containing unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) is pulled from the water aboard forward staging base (Interim) USS Ponce (AFSB(I)-15) during training exercises. Commander, Task Group (CTG) 56.1 conducts mine countermeasure, explosive ordnance disposal, salvage-diving and force protection operations throughout the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas S. Tenorio/Released)

3) Our Naval School Explosive Ordnance Disposal is the site where all four services receive initial training as EOD technicians.

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (March 22, 2012) Seaman Apprentice Aaron Gorby, a student at Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School, tapes a fuse prior to removal during a training scenario in the Tools and Methods division. The school provides high-risk, specialized, basic and advanced EOD training to more than 2,200 U.S. and partner nation military and selected U.S. government personnel each year. (U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Elizabeth Allen/Released)
EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (March 22, 2012) Seaman Apprentice Aaron Gorby, a student at Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School, tapes a fuse prior to removal during a training scenario in the Tools and Methods division. The school provides high-risk, specialized, basic and advanced EOD training to more than 2,200 U.S. and partner nation military and selected U.S. government personnel each year. (U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Elizabeth Allen/Released)

4) In most disciplines, the equipment is the weapon system; however, the Navy EOD community’s weapon system is their Sailors.

IMPERIAL BEACH, Calif. (April 21, 2016) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technicians, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 (EODMU 11), fast-rope out of an MH-60S Seahawk, attached to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 (HSC 23), during a helicopter rope suspension training (HRST). During HRST, EODMU 11 members practice casting, repelling and fast-roping techniques during the daytime and then at night to maintain the certifications necessary for the EOD rate. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kelsey L. Adams/Released)
IMPERIAL BEACH, Calif. (April 21, 2016) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technicians, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 (EODMU 11), fast-rope out of an MH-60S Seahawk, attached to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 (HSC 23), during a helicopter rope suspension training (HRST). During HRST, EODMU 11 members practice casting, repelling and fast-roping techniques during the daytime and then at night to maintain the certifications necessary for the EOD rate. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kelsey L. Adams/Released)

5) The U.S. Navy EOD Force is comprised of 2 EOD groups, 8 EOD mobile units, 2 mobile diving and salvage units, 2 EOD training and evaluation units, Naval School EOD, Naval Dive and Salvage Training Center, and Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head EOD Technology Division.

 

Thank our U.S. Navy EOD Sailors for their service by leaving your comments below!

 

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