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Two chief petty officer combination covers are displayed while Cmdr. Paul Lyons, commanding officer of guided-missile destroyer USS Stethem (DDG 63), addresses the shipÕs newest chiefs during a pinning ceremony aboard the ship. Stethem is part of the Forward Deployed Naval Force stationed in Yokosuka, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Danny Ewing Jr. (RELEASED)
Two chief petty officer combination covers are displayed while Cmdr. Paul Lyons, commanding officer of guided-missile destroyer USS Stethem (DDG 63), addresses the shipÕs newest chiefs during a pinning ceremony aboard the ship. Stethem is part of the Forward Deployed Naval Force stationed in Yokosuka, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Danny Ewing Jr. (RELEASED)

A Special Day For Our Navy

By Vice Adm. Bill Moran
Chief of Naval Personnel

Today is a special day in the Navy. For approximately 4,700 active and reserve Sailors, it is a time for reflection, family celebration and excitement for the opportunities that lie ahead.  It is also a day of transformation.  Today we pin anchors on our newly-minted Chiefs.

Chief’s anchors are a symbol of expertise, trust, partnership and above all…leadership.  From this day forward, these new Chief Petty Officers will immediately be seen through a different lens by seniors and juniors alike.

This past week, Fleet Master Chief April Beldo and I visited Bahrain and met with Sailors on the Navy’s front lines in the Arabian Gulf.

We visited a number of commands to hear what was on their minds and listen to their concerns.  We also met with leaders at all levels and visited the Chief’s mess at every stop; their insights, humility, and honesty are invaluable to me.  You can tell a lot about a command walking into the Chief’s mess… you can feel the energy or sense any anxiety.  In effect, you quickly cut to the core of the ship.

MANAMA, Bahrain (Sept. 9, 2015) Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, left, and Vice Adm. Bill Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel, speak to chief petty officer selectees onboard Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) during an in port visit. Essex is the flagship of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and, with the embarked 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Huey D. Younger Jr./Released)
MANAMA, Bahrain (Sept. 9, 2015) Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, left, and Vice Adm. Bill Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel, speak to chief petty officer selectees onboard Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) during an in port visit. Essex is the flagship of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) and, with the embarked 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Huey D. Younger Jr./Released)



Along the way, we came across Chief-selects from each command one week before their pinning.  We saw young selectees, and we saw seasoned ones.  We saw fire in their eyes.  But more than anything, we saw a group of men and women who were anxious to become part of the conscious of our Navy – to always do what’s right.

YORKTOWN, Va. (Sept. 4, 2015) Chief petty officer selectees assigned to Pre-commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) participate in the Yorktown Heritage Pride Run as part of CPO 365 phase two. CPO 365 is a year-round training initiative that Chiefs Messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Christopher Delano/Released)
YORKTOWN, Va. (Sept. 4, 2015) Chief petty officer selectees assigned to Pre-commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) participate in the Yorktown Heritage Pride Run as part of CPO 365 phase two. CPO 365 is a year-round training initiative that Chiefs Messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Christopher Delano/Released)

As a young, green, junior officer, I was fortunate to have several great Chiefs who guided me, picked me up when I needed it, had my back when I needed it, whispered in my ear when I really needed it – they showed me the ropes, taught me, mentored me, helped me become a better leader.  Throughout my career, and especially as CNP, I’ve had the privilege of serving with many exceptional Chiefs.  Their honest feedback has helped me immensely as we navigate through challenging times and new initiatives designed to positively impact Sailors’ lives every day.

Commanders and junior enlisted Sailors rely on Chiefs for their technical and professional expertise and deck plate leadership. They lead best with humility at their core.  They motivate by example, with optimism and energy, to develop more effective young leaders at every level….and their smallest of actions help shape and influence lives and careers.

To today’s new chiefs, forge ahead with purpose, lift your heads high, and serve your Sailors, your Mess, your Navy, and your nation with pride.

Be courageous.  Be humble.  Lead with purpose.

See you in the Fleet,
CNP

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