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Operations Specialist 2nd Class Martin Vories compares the flame-resistant variant (FRV) coverall with standard coveralls worn by Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Mark Birzer.
Operations Specialist 2nd Class Martin Vories compares the flame-resistant variant (FRV) coverall with standard coveralls worn by Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Mark Birzer.

Navy Uniform Changes

From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

WASHINGTON – A number of uniform changes are in the works to improve uniform appearance and better meet the needs of Sailors, personnel officials said Aug. 13.

The below changes will be incorporated into an upcoming Navy Uniform NAVADMIN:

  • In alignment with the value Navy places on command, flag officers who have earned Command At Sea or Command Ashore pins are authorized to wear the insignia in the post-command manner (left side).

o   If both pins have been earned, the insignia of choice (but only one) may be worn.

o   The prohibition of earning a command pin as a flag officer remains in effect.

  • Wear of the knit watch cap will expand to allow wear by all Sailors in cold weather environments in working, service and dress uniforms when wearing a bridge coat, reefer (officers and chief petty officers (CPOs)), pea coat (E6 and below), cold weather parka, Navy Working Uniform (NWU)  Type 1 Parka or all weather coat.  The knit cap cannot be worn with the Eisenhower jacket since it is not considered cold weather outerwear.
Lt. Jessica Crownover wears the Navy watch cap with reefer jacket with her service uniform. Wear of the knit watch cap will expand to allow wear by all Sailors in cold weather environments in working, service and dress uniforms.
Lt. Jessica Crownover wears the Navy watch cap with reefer jacket with her service uniform. Wear of the knit watch cap will expand to allow wear by all Sailors in cold weather environments in working, service and dress uniforms.

 

  • Some out-of-production optional uniform items will be eliminated in about a year  because of low demand by the Fleet, lack of production and to streamline the Navy uniform inventory. Sailors can continue wearing these items until the termination of wear date is announced in an upcoming NAVADMIN. Items being discontinued are:

o   Boat Cloaks for male officers and chief petty officers (CPOs).

o   Dress Capes for officer and enlisted females.

o   Tiaras and berets for females.

o   Overshoes: the slip on components that cover shoes or boots used to protect footwear from getting wet from rain and snow. Rain or snow boots remain authorized.

o   The khaki windbreaker worn by officers and CPOs.

  • Navy is expanding sales of NWU Type III for authorized commands to purchase by Government Commercial Purchase Card or authorized purchase order. Sales are available now through the Navy Exchange’s (NEX) Navy Uniform Support Call Center, at NEX Uniform Stores in Bahrain and Jebel Ali, and coming soon to NEX Uniform Stores in Guam and Rota, Spain.
  • With the introduction of the Flame Resistant Variant (FRV) coverall as the at-sea uniform, the need for four sets of NWU Type Is has diminished. Navy will be dropping the sea bag requirement to three sets of NWU Type Is beginning Oct. 1.
  • The issuance of FRV coveralls aboard ships has also decreased the usage of coveralls included in Sailors’ sea bags. As a result, beginning Oct. 1, these coveralls will be worn only as a cleaning and dirty-work garment rather than a uniform. Here are the wear changes for coveralls:

o   These coveralls will only have an embroidered name tape over the right breast pocket; Navy embroidered service tapes, breast insignia and rank insignia will not be authorized on coveralls.

o   Sailors must change out of coveralls and into uniform of the day or civilian clothes when departing their work space and command.

o   As always, when wearing head gear salutes will be rendered.

o   There is no change in the sea bag requirement of two pairs of coveralls. Though the replacement cycle will increase from six months to a year.

Operations Specialist 2nd Class Martin Vories compares the flame-resistant variant (FRV) coverall with standard coveralls worn by Aviation Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Mark Birzer.
Operations Specialist 2nd Class Martin Vories compares the flame-resistant variant (FRV) coverall with standard coveralls worn by Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Mark Birzer.

 

  • The light weight NWU Type I will be available in April for Sailors starting with Bahrain, Diego Garcia, Pearl Harbor and Guam.
  • Two new outerwear uniform items are making their way to Sailors as either an optional or sea bag item.

o   The optional cold weather parka will be available in limited numbers for purchase in NEX Uniform Stores in Norfolk Naval Base and Arlington, Virginia, and Newport, Rhode Island and through the NEX Uniform Support Call Center this November. The unisex parka can be worn with the NWU Fleece in service and service dress uniforms, as well as civilian clothes when the rank tab is removed, and is expected to cost around $330.

o   The now optional double breasted all weather coat with belt will be issued to recruits at Boot Camp beginning Oct. 1. The mandatory wear date for the coat is Oct. 1, 2020 and will be announced in an upcoming NAVADMIN.

  • The E1-E6 Service Dress Blue uniform will begin to be available beginning Oct. 1, 2016 with the E1-E6 Service Dress White uniform out Oct. 1, 2017. These dates will allow the manufacturer to focus production on one uniform at a time to produce sufficient initial quantity to outfit recruits at Boot Camp and Sailors throughout the Fleet while maintaining quality control.

o   As always, when wearing head gear salutes will be rendered.

o   There is no change in the sea bag requirement of two pairs of coveralls. Though the replacement cycle will increase from six months to a year.

  • The light weight NWU Type I will be available in April for Sailors starting with Bahrain, Diego Garcia, Pearl Harbor and Guam.
  • Two new outerwear uniform items are making their way to Sailors as either an optional or sea bag item.

o   The optional cold weather parka will be available in limited numbers for purchase in NEX Uniform Stores in Norfolk Naval Base and Arlington, Virginia, and Newport, Rhode Island and through the NEX Uniform Support Call Center this November. The unisex parka can be worn with the NWU Fleece in service and service dress uniforms, as well as civilian clothes when the rank tab is removed, and is expected to cost around $330.

o   The now optional double breasted all weather coat with belt will be issued to recruits at Boot Camp beginning Oct. 1. The mandatory wear date for the coat is Oct. 1, 2020 and will be announced in an upcoming NAVADMIN.

  • The E1-E6 Service Dress Blue uniform will begin to be available beginning Oct. 1, 2016 with the E1-E6 Service Dress White uniform out Oct. 1, 2017. These dates will allow the manufacturer to focus production on one uniform at a time to produce sufficient initial quantity to outfit recruits at Boot Camp and Sailors throughout the Fleet while maintaining quality control.

For more information on uniforms see the Navy Uniform Matters page at http://www.npc.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/uniforms/Pages/default2.aspx

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15 comments

  1. Help me, the Navy has got to have the most combinations of uniforms of any service on earth. Back in 1967 the seabag was pretty simple. The only extra item we received going to Vietnam was two sets of greens, jungle boots and eight sided cover.

  2. Yup back to the good old days. Snipes when leaving the hole had to be in the uniform of the day to eat chow so had to change and get in line the go back and change. In Pearl the DD’s had outside chow lines on the weather decks. Staff members would be on the lookout for any ship that allowed dungrees in the chow line. Try putting on a set of whites (undressed) when filthy and grease without getting some of the crap on your whites. Well now I guess the blueberry uniform will not show up all the spots. That’s progress shipmates. MMCS(SW)(SS) USN Ret.

  3. Why are sailors still wearing that style of belt buckle in a working uniform? In my experience, those dressy belt buckles could be counted on to pop open or entirely fall off, and dropping a hunk of brass FOD is a serious issue in aircraft maintenance.

  4. Believe me we dont wear those. Only office types do. Everyone else wears rigger belts.

  5. Actually we have the least amount of uniforms compared to army, airforce and especially the corps.

  6. I hadn’t recalled my maintainers wearing them either, but I feel that if it were a working uniform, it should be uniformly designed for working, so brass buckles shouldn’t even be authorized.

    If I could, I would probably downgrade most working uniforms down to organizational clothing, but also do away with covers and most insignia for it. It could be worse, I think the Army salutes in PT gear.

  7. We also salute in PT gear, when covered.

  8. Do these uniforms still contain plastic (i.e. synthetics). You went to aquaflage because sailors wanted to have their own camo and be cool. Well, 100% cotton is great for flash protection. Polycotton will melt to your skin. I was issued the fire proof prison uniforms in the early 70’s only to find out the ‘fire proofing’ was history after 3 laundry cycles.

    How long will the ‘flame resistance’ last?
    Coveralls are a pain in the neck and look like crap.
    If sailors need to look like Marines, they ought to go to Marine boot camp. Sailors should look like sailors.
    I must be the happiest man in the world; I’m not done bit**ing

  9. One thing is for sure …these uniform changes will go on and on as long as someone can make money on them – that’s endlessly …and the poor squids will continue to be stuck with the tab the changes.

    I did my 25 between 1963 and 1988 and saw more than my share of them and despised them. Squids always loved and went back to their seafarers and crackerjacks whenever they were given an option.

    D. Fahlstrom MCPO (ret.)

  10. Don’t forget awards and promotions…every time the uniform changes someone gets an MSM and soon there after a promotion!

  11. If I was not 46 years older and 40 lbs heavier……….My Marine Blues would STILL be in regulationfrom1971.

  12. Some of those uniforms that are projected out to 2020 not to worry the Navy will change them before the deadline and they will become optional while they’re being phased out. If there is anything that is constant it is uniform change in the navy.

  13. The Navy in its infinite lunacy.

  14. It’s after October 1st, but why do I still see Sailors wearing coveralls with rank on the collar and “U.S. NAVY” on the Old Coveralls?

  15. It’s 2015
    Services don’t wear BDU’s anymore
    Sick and tired of people thinking we still wear that, no one has worn that pattern in almost 10 years!

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