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Female Uniform Initiatives – 8 Things to Know

From Uniform Matters Office

Several significant female uniform initiatives have been in the press and discussed at all hands calls and events across the Fleet. A “choker” style Service Dress White (SDW) uniform for officers and chiefs, was recently showcased at the U.S. Naval Academy graduation and a Cracker-Jack style Service Dress Blues (SDB) for E6 and below that will appear next year. There are some other Sailor and Fleet requested design improvements for women’s uniforms that are in the pipeline.

Information Technician 3rd Class Alyza Marie Santos, left, Electronic Technician 2nd Class Melissa Rheaume and Master-at Arms 2nd Class Ashley Ann Fisher discuss their observations about the new female E6 and below service dress blue uniform prototypes they are testing as part of a preliminary, three-week wear evaluation, May 29, 2014. Twenty-seven participants were outfitted with two prototype design version of the Dixie hat, one service dress blue jumper top and two different service dress blue slack designs-one front-zipper and one side-zipper design. This preliminary evaluation will gather initial feedback that the Uniform Matters Office can incorporate into an improved design for the Extended Wear Evaluation this fall. (U.S. Navy photo by Sharon Anderson/Released)
Information Technician 3rd Class Alyza Marie Santos, left, Electronic Technician 2nd Class Melissa Rheaume and Master-at Arms 2nd Class Ashley Ann Fisher discuss their observations about the new female E6 and below service dress blue uniform prototypes they are testing as part of a preliminary, three-week wear evaluation, May 29, 2014.

Here are eight things to know about planned uniform changes:

1. Female uniform changes in the works include a beltless khaki slack for wear with the overblouse; a pencil design skirt in white and khaki, and enlarging the internal pocket of the officer and chief SDB and SDW uniforms to accommodate larger items like cell phones. We are looking at what we can do to shorten the timeline from design to Fleet introduction.

2. We’ve completed the improvement to the female khaki tuck-in shirt with reinforced stitching to the shirt’s bottom hem.

3. The Navy’s goal is to provide greater uniformity among Sailors as well as an overall improved quality, comfort, and appearance in our uniforms.

4. To develop a better fit for our uniforms, Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility is collecting data on Sailors’ measurements to update baseline sizes, patterns and designs used for manufacturing all uniforms. We have been relying on data from 1988 for females and 1997 for males and the new information will be used to update all our uniform patterns.

CHARLESTOWN, Mass. (Feb. 6, 2014) Master-at-Arms 1st Class Mary Morrison, from Mountain View, Okla., assigned to USS Constitution, tries on a Dixie cup cover to be used for the new E1-E6 service dress blue female uniform with a uniform official during a fit evaluation.
CHARLESTOWN, Mass. (Feb. 6, 2014) Master-at-Arms 1st Class Mary Morrison, from Mountain View, Okla., assigned to USS Constitution, tries on a Dixie cup cover to be used for the new E1-E6 service dress blue female uniform with a uniform official during a fit evaluation.

5. Leadership has finalized the design, timeline, and transition for the female E6 and below SDB, improved white Cracker-Jacks and the Dixie cup cover. Timeline for the roll out of the new uniforms is being developed and is expected to begin within the next two years.

6. A female officers and chiefs choker version of the SDW coat and the alternate combination cover has been approved. A wear test of the prototype is being conducted this summer and the information gathered will be used to inform the final design. The coat is expected to be available for purchase and optional wear early next year. Mandatory wear date has not been determined, but will be before January 2020.

7. The alternate combination covers for men and women will be available for purchase and optional wear by the end of this year.

8. Like any acquisition process, there is a very detailed and lengthy timeline. From the initial concept to final production, to produce a new uniform or to incorporate any design change into an existing uniform item can take 36 to 48 months from concept to roll out.

WASHINGTON (Dec. 18, 2013) Lt. Heidi Boettger and Chief Yeoman Brianne Dentson model a prototype for the female combination cover, redesigned to more closely resemble the male version.
WASHINGTON (Dec. 18, 2013)
Lt. Heidi Boettger and Chief Yeoman Brianne Dentson model a prototype for the female combination cover, redesigned to more closely resemble the male version.

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22 comments

  1. why are we changing to something which is more expensive and unisex for the Officers? Nothing is wrong with the women’s uniform now. Another waste of money for someone to get a FIREP bullet in the Pentagon. Knock off the nonsense.

  2. It is funny the more things change the more they stay the same. One thing here is the test Sailors must not know the regs on Hair length. For females if things have not changed; the hair may touch the collar but, not fall below it. The ET2’s hair is well below the collar on that jumper. Come on these are supposed to be the Picture Perfect Sailors and we can’t even get this right?

  3. Women want equality wear the same uniform as the men.

  4. The uniform does not matter to me, do your job and be squared away. Other than the hair issue with the test Sailor the new E6 and below uniform is good to go!

  5. Look closely her hair is cut and only touching the collar, i thought the same before a little looking a little more

  6. If you look at the t-shirt the hair is touching the collar inside of the jumper top. It is also touching the neckerchief on the outside of the jumper top; both are below the collar of the jumper.

  7. Cutting Veterans pensions by 20%, but redesigning all the military’s uniforms?Something’s wrong with this picture.

  8. At least they went about from the old grey shirt and front pocket dungarees to camies or overalls. for work

  9. Unisex uniforms, please!!!

  10. It’s funny, because that was one of the first things I noticed! “Whoa! Hair out of regs!” Lol! I even zoomed in. It’s out of regs.

  11. I’d actually prefer to have my dungarees back.

  12. The dungarees with the same pockets on the front and on the back?

  13. I miss those, they were very comfortable and we didn’t look like we were trying to be soldiers.

  14. Seafarers dungarees, the best.

  15. Yep, same pair. Love them. They fit great, we’re soft, and I could actually get them off over my boondockers for use as a flotation (not that I ever needed to after bootcamp). I still have a pair and a few flight suits left.

  16. “With jumper uniforms,
    hair may extend a maximum of 1-1/2 inches below the
    top of the jumper collar.”

    Article 2201.1

  17. Wow, I just looked that up and that is a shocker.
    Thank you, Fatima.
    No idea why that uniform is any different than another. Seems like it should not be!

  18. No thanks. I loved my BDUs. Glad I had ’em. Way too comfortable.

  19. I’m glad I’m NOT the only one who noticed that.

  20. Why? Cracker Jacks DON’T belong on women! NONE OF THESE DO! Why can’t we just leave it alone? Women are women and men are men. Enough with the “We have to be *JUST* like the men!” bull. Celebrate being a woman for once rather than fighting it.

  21. And the cost off this is???

  22. I don’t mind the blues, women have dress white jumpers, but It looks like they’re playing dress up with the men’s covers…like that old war poster….”Gee, I wish I were a man, I’d join the Navy.” What’s wrong with females looking a little different?? No shame in a woman not looking exactly like a man.

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