Home / Inside the Navy / Five Things You Need to Know about Retaliation
PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 6, 2013) Sailors and Marines stand in ranks on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) before a CO’s call with the crew and embarked Marines from the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (13th MEU). Boxer is underway for a scheduled deployment as part of the Boxer Amphibious Ready Group. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Conor Minto/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 6, 2013) Sailors and Marines stand in ranks on the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) before a CO’s call with the crew and embarked Marines from the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (13th MEU). Boxer is underway for a scheduled deployment as part of the Boxer Amphibious Ready Group. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Conor Minto/Released)

Five Things You Need to Know about Retaliation

By 21st Century Sailor Office

The issue of retaliation, especially towards victims of sexual assault, has been in the news lately. Retaliation is a destructive behavior, and you can play a role in preventing and reporting it.

Here are five things you need to know about retaliation:

  1. Retaliation is harmful action against someone for something they did or said. It includes ostracism and is often described as professional or social. Retaliation is a violation of the UCMJ.
  1. Professional retaliation against a Sailor could be loss of privileges, a denied promotion or training, or being transferred to a less favorable job. If you or someone you know is assigned extra watches, or denied chances to qualify for a warfare pin because they reported a crime or other violation, it’s your duty to let someone know so it can be stopped and those responsible held appropriately accountable.
  1. Social retaliation, or ostracism, means excluding someone from social acceptance, or denying privilege of friendship just because they reported or intend to report a crime. Retaliation amongst peers can be just as damaging to someone as professional retaliation.
  1. Social media can be a common platform for social retaliation. Commands and Sailors should be aware that in the online world, messages and comments can discourage reporting of a crime and ostracize those who have already stepped forward.  Social media posts should be treated just the same as if the message was publicly announced on the mess decks.  If you wouldn’t say it in person in public then you shouldn’t be posting it on social media.
  1. From recruits, to junior petty officers, to commanding officers, training is being updated to ensure retaliation is better recognized and discussed in order to work towards eliminating it in the Fleet.  But you don’t have to attend a class to put a stop to this problem. You can act now. Every command, and everyone in it, must work to assess its climate to ensure there is an environment that allows for Sailors to do the right thing without fear of retaliation.

Retaliation against anyone, in any form, is prohibited. We must stop the harm that retaliation brings to a Sailor, a command and our Navy. It’s your job to report offenses that come under your observation.  It’s your job to treat all of those who report a crime with honor and respect.  It’s your job to report retaliation when it occurs, and you can do that through your chain of command, through a trusted mentor, or through the inspector general hotline at 1-800-522-3451 or visit the Secretary of the Navy website: http://www.secnav.navy.mil/ig.

 

 

Comments

comments

About U.S. Navy

Check Also

YOKOSUKA, Japan (June 17, 2017) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter Burghart/Released)

Special Report: USS Fitzgerald Collision

USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) was involved in a collision with a merchant vessel at approximately …

2 comments

  1. What a joke… It usually done by seniors in descrete ways, when you report it they says it’s all in your head and imagined, so is never really investigated unless you have serious evidence, years of logged daily logs, evals, transfers, new “assignments” won’t warrant anything! Even email the CNO directly he won’t look into…. Just tell you to “rethink” your decision. Then do a congressional it will get worse and the congress can’t get straight answers. Retaliation under the current system is going to happen so my advice to you all is be prepared for rath and document everything!

  2. 2 sounds like E.M.I (Extra Military Instruction) but not in this statement

Leave a Reply