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5 Things Sailor Need to Know About Bystander Intervention Training

From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

At various All Hands Calls across the Navy, Sailors continue to criticize the boredom and ineffectiveness of large-group, computer-based training. Instead, they ask for small group, peer-led, interactive training. Navy leaders have heard those requests and are moving forward with a new, assertive effort to prevent destructive behaviors and decisions.

OKINAWA, Japan (May 21, 2014) Fleet Master Chief April Beldo speaks with Sailors after an all-hands call at Camp Shields in Okinawa, Japan, May 21, 2014.  Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) Vice Adm. Bill Moran and Beldo fielded questions and discussed topics such as petty officer advancement, uniform matters and the Enlisted Early Transition Program.  (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Kim Martinez/Released)
Fleet Master Chief April Beldo speaks with Sailors after an all-hands call at Camp Shields in Okinawa, Japan, May 21, 2014. Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) Vice Adm. Bill Moran and Beldo fielded questions and discussed topics such as petty officer advancement, uniform matters and the Enlisted Early Transition Program. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Kim Martinez/Released)

 

Most Sailors are aware of what bystander intervention is, but how to execute it is a little more difficult in certain situations. The upcoming training will provide Sailors with the skills to act to help a shipmate.

Here are five things you need to know about Bystander Intervention Training:

  1. Sailor participation is crucial to making this effective. You wouldn’t hesitate to intervene if you saw a shipmate about to fall overboard or walk into a propeller arc – why wouldn’t you do the same when a shipmate is about to drive after a night of drinking? This training seeks to build on the same idea of being a shipmate.
  2. Bystander intervention training is often associated with sexual assault prevention training. However, this new training goes beyond just stopping a potential sexual assault. It covers the entire range of destructive behaviors, from alcohol abuse to hazing, harassment and suicide.
  3. The new bystander intervention training is a direct result of Sailor feedback – you asked for more interactive and hands-on training. It will be led by your peers in groups of no more than 30 Sailors. No more boring power points.
  4. The training is being introduced this summer and Sailors can expect to begin receiving it at their commands this fall. All Sailors must complete this training by September 2015.
  5. The skills you’ll learn will enable you to help and protect your shipmates and prevent them from making a destructive decision that could end their career, or worse, their life.

Fleet problems demand fleet solutions – you, the Sailor, are going to be the solution to helping a shipmate in need. It’s imperative to have the skills to do so.

In the video below, Fleet Master Chief April Beldo talks about the upcoming bystander intervention training.

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  1. Sure looks like they are succeeding – the picture shows two groups “All AA Females”in a group in the foreground and all males both White and AA in the background. Looks more like “diversity traing” than bystander intervention training. ANOTHER waste of Defense and Taxpayers dollars in the name of training.

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