Naval Personnel Command: Working for Sailors, Families and Retirees

By Vice Adm. Bill Moran
Chief of Naval Personnel

Tomorrow, I will preside over the Naval Personnel Command (NPC) change of command. Rear Adm. Cindy Covell will hand over the reins to Rear Adm. Dave Steindl, concluding a busy and productive tour at the helm of NPC.

While at the ceremony we will pay tribute to individual accomplishments, this blog highlights ongoing the efforts of the whole team.

Chief Hospital Corpsman Daryhl Tolley gives Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Ramon Eusebio permission at Naval Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn., to process a set of permanent change of station orders, Nov. 17, 2009. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class LaTunya Howard/Released)

Chief Hospital Corpsman Daryhl Tolley gives Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Ramon Eusebio permission at Naval Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn., to process a set of permanent change of station orders, Nov. 17, 2009. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class LaTunya Howard/Released)

As many of you know, NPC affects the lives of our entire Navy family. The men and women who serve there are charged with a very broad spectrum of responsibilities, but ultimately it’s about getting the correct Sailor, with the right skills, into the right job, at the right time.

This includes functions as important and diverse as the selection of future chiefs, command master chiefs and commanding officers. Our shipmates in Millington also enable the operations of personnel support detachments across the globe that support all of us.

I often think of this dedicated workforce as the engine room of the Navy. We move forward because of hundreds of dedicated Navy civilians and Sailors who keep the plant running every day. As I put the finishing touches on my remarks I am struck by all that they have achieved over the last two years to increase trust, balance and stability in our manning and manpower efforts.

A few to consider include:

  • Aggressively working to help fill and close critical gaps at sea. They emphasize the placement of Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority fleet billets. We have seen those gaps at sea cut roughly in half, while providing Sailors with more career choices and predictability – resulting in increased readiness for the Navy as a whole.
  • Providing real-time data that directly contributes to Sailor and family resiliency. The Personnel Tempo Program Management Office (PERSTEMPO; previously ITEMPO) is providing increased clarity and critical information to commanders, down to the day, on how long their people have been deployed. While only a few months old, we are already seeing results with near 99 percent accuracy – providing insights to help us identify problems before they develop.
  • Improving administrative customer service. By consolidating our worldwide personnel support and customer service detachments under NPC, we are streamlining and improving Navy’s pay and personnel services. This is a big task and one we have to get right. Through unity of command and with a fresh set of eyes, I am confident you will soon see the improvements that you deserve.

Most of us only think about the work being done at NPC when we need placement for the next assignment or something added to our personnel record. That’s all true, but NPC does so much more and all of it is done with a weather eye towards making our experience in the Navy the best that it can be. Everyone there knows it’s not perfect, and that they have miles to go – just know that these folks are thinking about you day in and day out.

As we bid farewell to Rear Adm. Covell and welcome aboard Rear Adm. Steindl, you can be assured that one thing will remain constant; the uniformed and civilian workforce at NPC will continue to help keep the fleet ready by meeting Sailor, family and retiree needs.

See you around the fleet.