Home / Navy Life / Health, Wealth & Safety / YOUR Navy Operating Forward – Arabian Gulf, Djibouti, Spain
Parachute Rigger 1st Class Morgan, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposable Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8, freefalls during military free fall jump sustainment training in Sevilla, Spain, Dec. 23. EODMU 8 performs quarterly sustainment training to maintain proficiency. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
Parachute Rigger 1st Class Morgan, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposable Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8, freefalls during military free fall jump sustainment training in Sevilla, Spain, Dec. 23. EODMU 8 performs quarterly sustainment training to maintain proficiency. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

YOUR Navy Operating Forward – Arabian Gulf, Djibouti, Spain

Right now your Navy is 100 percent on watch around the globe helping to preserve the American way of life. Whether it be operating and training off the coast of Spain or forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf, the flexibility and presence provided by our U.S. naval forces provides national leaders with great options for protecting and maintaining our national security and interests around the world. The imagery below highlights the Navy’s ability to provide those options by operating forward.

Parachute Rigger 1st Class Morgan, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8, freefalls during military free fall jump sustainment training in Sevilla, Spain, Dec. 23. EODMU 8 performs quarterly sustainment training to maintain proficiency. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
Parachute Rigger 1st Class Morgan, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 8, freefalls during military free fall jump sustainment training in Sevilla, Spain, Dec. 23. EODMU 8 performs quarterly sustainment training to maintain proficiency. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
A landing craft air cushion (LCAC) assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5 approaches the well deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) in the Arabian Gulf, Dec. 26. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Conor Minto/Released)
A landing craft air cushion (LCAC) assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5 approaches the well deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) in the Arabian Gulf, Dec. 26. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Conor Minto/Released)
Damage Controlman 2nd Class Jesse Rollo conducts a counter measure wash-down test on the fantail aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) in the Atlantic Ocean, Dec. 28. Monterey is scheduled to return to homeport in Norfolk after a nine-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Billy Ho/Released)
Damage Controlman 2nd Class Jesse Rollo conducts a counter measure wash-down test on the fantail aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) in the Atlantic Ocean, Dec. 28. Monterey is scheduled to return to homeport in Norfolk after a nine-month deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Billy Ho/Released)
Chief Hospital Corpsman Emeterio Donato, left, Lt. Shane Modglin and Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Joseph Casim, the preventative medicine team for Camp Lemonnier's expeditionary medical facility, take readings from air-quality monitoring equipment on Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Dec. 27. The monitoring is part of a yearlong air-quality testing project run by the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Dietrich/Released)
Chief Hospital Corpsman Emeterio Donato, left, Lt. Shane Modglin and Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Joseph Casim, the preventative medicine team for Camp Lemonnier’s expeditionary medical facility, take readings from air-quality monitoring equipment on Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Dec. 27. The monitoring is part of a yearlong air-quality testing project run by the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Eric Dietrich/Released)

Comments

comments

About Jason Kelly

Twitter: @JasonKellyPAO

Check Also

The main building of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., April 26, 2017. Completed in 1893, the building, designed by architect Richard Morris Hunt, houses the observatory's administrative department and is the headquarters of the Oceanographer and Navigator of the Navy. (U.S. Navy photo by Geoff Chester/Released)

5 Things to Know about the U.S. Naval Observatory

The U.S. Naval Observatory continues to be the leading authority in the United States for …

One comment

  1. Every day navy is operating on all corners of world to give security of navigations, put out all risk causes such us mines, pirateties, and more other, for assure ground operations, freedom, security to us. but duties ae more and any day the situation had different aspect also if appaently the same, aspects that requie specific manner of operating. For we thanks buddies for all have made and make and wish then serenity and a happy new year, wherever deployed, remembering they are not alone, never as we are with them and they on our hearts and thougts.

Leave a Reply