Navy Expeditionary Combat Command: Diversity of Mission, Diversity of Talent

By Vice Adm. Bill Moran
Chief of Naval Personnel

Another great fleet visit this week. Fleet Master Chief April Beldo and I had the opportunity to escape DC and spend a day in Norfolk with Sailors at the Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in Little Creek.

Sailors from Coastal Riverine Group 2 (CRG 2) present a technical demonstration to Vice Adm. William Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel in Virginia Beach, Va., Oct. 23. The exhibit displayed the unit’s advanced proficiency to accomplish their mission. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jared Aldape/Released)

Sailors from Coastal Riverine Group 2 (CRG 2) present a technical demonstration to Vice Adm. William Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel in Virginia Beach, Va., Oct. 23. The exhibit displayed the unit’s advanced proficiency to accomplish their mission. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jared Aldape/Released)

 

Sailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 12 participate in a door breach training evolution at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Va., Oct. 23. EODMU 12 provides operational explosive ordnance disposal capability as required for the location, identification, rendering safe, recovery, field evaluation and disposal of all explosive ordnance, including chemical and nuclear weapons. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese/Released)

Sailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 12 participate in a door breach training evolution at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Va., Oct. 23. EODMU 12 provides operational explosive ordnance disposal capability as required for the location, identification, rendering safe, recovery, field evaluation and disposal of all explosive ordnance, including chemical and nuclear weapons. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese/Released)

As many of you know, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command is made up of Sailors from a variety of warfare communities – all with different backgrounds and experience. This diversity is the strength that allows this organization to undertake such a varied and important mission set, providing effective waterborne and ashore anti-terrorism, force protection, theater security cooperation and engagement, and humanitarian assistance/disaster relief capabilities.

Fleet Master Chief Beldo and I saw the awesome versatility and capability of these Sailors and the diversity of skill sets they bring to any contingency. While visiting with Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 12, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 2, Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2, and Coastal Riverine Group 2, Sailors were motivated, proud and focused on training like they intend to fight.

Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2 (MDSU 2) conduct a surface supply dive operation while presenting a technical demonstration to Vice Adm. William Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel, Oct. 23. MDSU 2 is an expeditionary mobile unit homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek-Ft. Story. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jared Aldape/Released)

Sailors from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2 (MDSU 2) conduct a surface supply dive operation while presenting a technical demonstration to Vice Adm. William Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel, Oct. 23. MDSU 2 is an expeditionary mobile unit homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek-Ft. Story. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jared Aldape/Released)

 

From explosive ordnance disposal techs breaching doors and safing devices during a hostage rescue training scenario, to Navy divers conducting surface supply operations and mine countermeasure training, to riverine units maintaining control of the coastal waterways, it was an impressive array of “unique” warfighting capabilities. We witnessed firsthand the value and necessity of the high-tech and rigorous training necessary to continue to provide Sailors the wherewithal to stand a safe and professional watch.

Vice Adm. William Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel (right), detonates an explosive device during his visit to Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Oct. 23. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese/Released)

Vice Adm. William Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel (right), detonates an explosive device during his visit to Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Oct. 23. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Randy Savarese/Released)

This visit, like every fleet visit so far, strengthened my faith in our Sailors and the incredible responsibility that leadership lays on their shoulders; Sailors like the Navy’s newest master diver, who we met during a training exercise, a singularly Navy position of trust, confidence and responsibility. And Sailors who had recently returned from combat duty in the Gulf. Hearing from them directly and understanding their needs and concerns made the visit all the more important for me as I returned back here to DC.

Keep sending in your feedback and don’t hesitate to ask a question either virtually or in person. I will answer them, either directly on Navy Live or on the Navy Facebook page.

Thanks for your time and attention. See you in the fleet!