Our Efforts to Thrive Continue…

By Rear Adm. Sean Buck
Director, Twenty-First Century Sailor Office (N17)

During my nearly 30 years of service in our Navy, it’s safe to say that I’ve encountered my fair share of stress—both operational and personal. No matter the source, there was always something that I could count on to help me navigate, see things clearly, and keep an even keel; the camaraderie and cohesion I shared with my fellow Sailors.

Ishmael W. Stagner II, retired Army, member of the Statewide Prevent Suicide Hawaii Task Force, speaks to Logistics Specialist Seaman Joshua Williams after a Suicide Prevention seminar at Sharkey Theater on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. The Suicide Prevention Awareness month's theme is "Thrive in Your Community," encouraging everyone to get involved with their command and community to reach out to those in need, recognize the symptoms and prevent suicidal behavior.

Ishmael W. Stagner II, retired Army, member of the Statewide Prevent Suicide Hawaii Task Force, speaks to Logistics Specialist Seaman Joshua Williams after a Suicide Prevention seminar at Sharkey Theater on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. The Suicide Prevention Awareness month’s theme is “Thrive in Your Community,” encouraging everyone to get involved with their command and community to reach out to those in need, recognize the symptoms and prevent suicidal behavior.

 

As a leader, I’ve had to learn to “bounce back” from adversity as soon as possible in order to maintain my ability to look out for my Sailors and guide our mission. But as we’ve learned this month, the difference between bouncing back and thriving is one’s sense of community—I didn’t bounce back on my own; I had support. One of the greatest lessons I’ve learned about community is that you have to take care of yourself in order to help those that depend on you. Having the strength to seek help has to be something you can identify with before you can truly encourage others to do the same. Yet the courage to accept help is where it begins. Our natural inclination as Sailors is to give and not receive. But when we can find a way to do both—encouraging our shipmates to speak up about their stressors, and also speaking up about our own—we’ve evolved. The smallest action can have a rippling impact and we must all lead by example.

Rear Admiral Sean Buck, commander of Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 5th and 7th Fleets, takes time to answer questions and concerns from Sailors assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16.

Rear Admiral Sean Buck, commander of Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 5th and 7th Fleets, takes time to answer questions and concerns from Sailors assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16.

 

September may be coming to a close, but our efforts to help one another navigate stress, build resilience and thrive will continue. As we wrap up Suicide Prevention Month, take a moment to read about the impressive efforts that took place in our Navy over the past few weeks.

  • Joint Intelligence Center, Central Command Unit 0274 partnered with personnel from Information Dominance Corps East to contribute to a Habitat for Humanity Project benefiting the Jacksonville, Fl. community.
  • Sailors assigned to the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Ford (FFG 54) organized a suicide awareness run. Sailors who participated in the event ran a cumulative 32 miles, one mile for each suicide in the Navy this year.
  • Navy Warfare Development Command held a Suicide Prevention and Awareness Run, encouraging non-runners to sponsor runners. Sponsors agreed to receive suicide prevention and stress navigation awareness resources in exchange for their endorsement, and the runner with the most sponsors received special recognition.
  • Fleet Readiness Center Mid-Atlantic developed a wall in the break room for Sailors and leaders to post a compliment to a fellow shipmate for all to see as small tokens of appreciation.

These are just a few of the many efforts around the fleet helping us “thrive in our communities.” I have an immense sense of pride knowing that I serve with Sailors who truly look out for and support their shipmates through calm and rough seas.

Honor, courage and commitment at their finest.

Thank you for your dedication to one another, and please keep up the great work.

Rear Adm. Sean Buck, director of the 21st Century Sailor Office, responds to questions during a sexual assault prevention panel at the United States Navy Memorial. The panel is part of the Year of Military Women.

Rear Adm. Sean Buck, director of the 21st Century Sailor Office, responds to questions during a sexual assault prevention panel at the United States Navy Memorial. The panel is part of the Year of Military Women.

 

Editor’s note: For more examples of “Thrive in Your Community” events, like U.S. Navy Operational Stress Control on Facebook or visit the Suicide Prevention Month webpage.

If you, your shipmate, or a loved one is having trouble navigating stress or experiencing a crisis, help is always available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Seeking help is a sign of strength.

Call the Military Crisis Line at 1-800-273-TALK and select option 1 or visit its website.

Confidential chaplain support also is available by calling 1-855-628-9311.

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