The Next Step in Sexual Assault Prevention Accountability

By Vice Adm. Bill Moran
Chief of Naval Personnel

Today, I signed out a policy providing additional guidance on how raters should evaluate blocks 34 and 35 on officer fitness reports, blocks 35 and 37 on chief petty officer evaluations and blocks 35 and 36 on enlisted evaluations. This guidance specifically addresses how those writing fitness reports and evaluations should evaluate officer, chief and enlisted contributions to command or organizational climate/equal opportunity and professional, as well as military bearing/character on fitness reports and evaluations.

No changes were made to the actual fitness report and evaluation forms.

Policy signed by Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Bill Moran provides additional guidance on how raters should evaluate how Sailors have cultivated or maintained a positive command climate free from sexual harassment, sexual assault, hazing, discrimination of any kind and other inappropriate conduct.

Policy signed by Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Bill Moran provides additional guidance on how raters should evaluate how Sailors have cultivated or maintained a positive command climate free from sexual harassment, sexual assault, hazing, discrimination of any kind and other inappropriate conduct.

 

Before you react with, “Why do I care?” or “What’s the big deal?” let me explain why we are making this change, and how it fits into our larger effort on command climate.

Everything we say and do has an effect on those around us.

Every commander, officer and Sailor is accountable for the contributions they make to the command climate and overall working environment.

This new guidance will reinforce to raters how Sailors should be evaluated in the performance areas, specifically how they impact command or organizational climate, equal opportunity, and military bearing and character.

 Under this new guidance, to achieve high marks in these blocks, Sailors must demonstrate how they have cultivated or maintained a positive command climate.

These blocks will be used to show how each Sailor reinforces a climate free from sexual harassment, sexual assault, hazing, discrimination of any kind, and other inappropriate conduct.

It is the responsibility of commanding officers to provide our people a responsible, professional and safe environment in which to work and live, and it’s the job of every Sailor to do their part.

Whether it’s a petty officer third class who leads the command’s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions chapter, a chief petty officer who professionally gives command sexual assault prevention and response training, or a commanding officer who works particularly hard to understand the “goods and bads” of their command climate before developing an inclusive plan to address problems, the guidance that we released today better explains how the people writing their evaluations should capture this good work.

In the context of our four sexual assault prevention and response lines of effort – prevention, victim response, investigation and accountability,

this is the next logical step under accountability, as we seek to convey that ultimate responsibility lies with our frontline leaders for creating a command climate that reinforces mutual respect and team building.

Additionally, these changes are synchronized with the command climate survey direction we provided to commanding officers and immediate superiors in command in the sexual assault prevention and response program initiatives NAVADMIN just last month.

It is important that all of us understand the role and “all hands ownership” that we have in fostering a command climate of dignity and respect.

Our Navy Ethos states that integrity is the foundation of our conduct. Respect for others is fundamental to our character; decisive leadership is crucial to our success. We all play a part in maintaining and improving a positive command climate.

Thanks for your time and attention. I look forward to seeing you in the fleet and reading your comments below and on social media.


Additional information and resources to combat sexual assault are available at http://www.sapr.navy.mil. Sexual assault affects Navy readiness, and the Navy is committed to preventing sexual assault. Join the Navy’s conversation about sexual assault on social media and help raise awareness by using #NavySAPR.  


What do you think about this policy guidance? Let us know by commenting below.

 

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