What You Need to Know About the Navy’s Next Generation Enterprise Network

The Navy awarded Hewlett Packard Enterprise Services a contract for the Next Generation Enterprise Network June 27. In this blog, the Department of the Navy’s Chief Information Officer Terry Halvorsen explains what NGEN means to the current 800,000 end-users on one of the largest intranets in the world.

With the new Next Generation Enterprise Network acquisition strategy, the Department of the Navy is investing in the future. We want to make sure you will continue to have the stable, secure computing platform you are accustomed to on one of the largest intranets in the world, Navy Marine Corps Intranet. NMCI provides security for all 800,000 Department of the Navy network users, defending against thousands of intrusion attempts and malware attacks.

Sailors work together to assess the security of the computer networks aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Jan 17, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Leonard Adams Jr./Released)

Sailors work together to assess the security of the computer networks aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Jan 17, 2013. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Leonard Adams Jr./Released)

 

The initial Marine Corps Intranet contract expired Sept. 30, 2010, and since then, we have been operating under a continuity of services contract as the transition between NMCI and NGEN. The continuity of services contract is scheduled to expire in June 2014. After months of review, the new NGEN contract was awarded to Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Services on June 27, 2013. HPES’s NGEN team — which includes AT&T Government Solutions, Inc., International Business Machines Global Business Services – Federal, Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. and Northrup Grumman Systems Corporation — will begin transitioning the Navy’s network services to the NGEN phase of NMCI immediately. The transition is expected to take up to 13 months.

Initially, you will not see any changes in your current computing capabilities. In the future, NMCI, the OCONUS Navy Enterprise Network (ONE-NET), IT-21 and the Marine Corps Enterprise Network will transform from four separate environments to a globally integrated network.

With its focus on reliability, adaptability, security and support for the warfighter, the NGEN contract phase of NMCI network services will ensure that you have timely access to the information and services necessary to accomplish your missions and functions. NGEN will improve the Navy and the Marine Corps command and control of network resources, enabling them to better meet mission requirements. It will support network operations and enhance our security and interoperability to face multi-dimensional and asymmetrical global threats.

In the future, you will see added capabilities. One capability that we’re testing and may be coming soon is hosted virtual desktop. Data and desktop applications would be hosted in a secure “cloud” rather than on a computer. Because the applications and data are stored in the cloud, you will be able to access it from any Common Access Card enabled device that can connect to the Internet. Since nothing is stored on the device used to access your virtual desktop, security is improved. Additionally, hosted virtual desktops provide users with increased flexibility, mobility and productivity through the ability to access one’s data remotely. This is just one of the future capabilities we are testing.

The Department of the Navy is continuously identifying and evaluating new capabilities to improve mobility, efficiency and security. Users can expect future improvements designed to improve their computing experience as we move into the Next Generation Enterprise Network contract phase of Navy Marine Corps Intranet network services.

How do you think this will help our Sailors? Let us know by commenting below.