Proper Accounting of Experience, Accomplishments Key to Service Record Success

By Rear Admiral Cynthia A. “Cindy” Covell
Deputy Chief of Naval Personnel
Commander, Navy Personnel Command

We want to ensure all Sailors have an opportunity to excel and thrive in our Navy, and a proper accounting of your experience and accomplishments is a key to that success. An accurate record is the means for documenting your service and a joint responsibility between you, your command and Navy Personnel Command.

Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) check their e-mail in the ship's library, April 19, 2010. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Leonard Adams/Released)

 

A first step is to go to www.npc.navy.mil – your one stop shop for pay and personnel information. While we realize there are a number of separate systems that manage portions of your record, we have provided links so you may easily access these systems and find the information you need. To help you better understand what is available, below are the top five things you need to be aware of when reviewing and maintaining your record.

The Official Military Personnel File is your official record and available for your review via Bupers Online. Information in this record affects every aspect of your career. It is critical for career progression, and supports your entitlement to pay, allowances and benefits. Do not assume that someone is doing this for you. It is your career, so be proactive and take all necessary actions to verify personnel record accuracy at least once a year, and when significant changes happen in your personal or professional life.

Chief Hospital Corpsman Hugo A. Castellanos, right, works with Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Mukarram Hossain, manpower clerk at Navy Operational Support Center Fort Worth, as they review Castellano's Electronic Service Record data in the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System, June 12, 2010. Image edited for security purposes. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Maria R. Escamilla/Released)

Chief Hospital Corpsman Hugo A. Castellanos, right, works with Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Mukarram Hossain, manpower clerk at Navy Operational Support Center Fort Worth, as they review Castellano’s Electronic Service Record data in the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System, June 12, 2010. Image edited for security purposes. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Maria R. Escamilla/Released)

Don’t confuse Electronic Service Record and the Official Military Personnel File.  The Electronic Service Record (found in the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System) and the Official Military Personnel File (found in BUPERS Online) is not the same thing. The Electronic Service Record is used by personnel support detachments and personnel offices and is not a permanent record once a member separates or retires. Data entered in the Electronic Service Record may be used to produce documents for submission into the Official Military Personnel File, but not all data in the Electronic Service Record is required to be entered in the Official Military Personnel File, like e-leave and PCS travel. The Official Military Personnel File is the Navy’s permanent record of an individual’s naval service.

Check your record at least annually in OMPF – My Record. All active duty and Reserve personnel having a BOL account, a Common Access Card and a CAC-enabled computer can now view their Official Military Personnel File record online by selecting the OMPF – My Record link under the BOL Application Menu. OMPF – My Record provides a secure and efficient method for Sailors to access and review their image record 24/7 and is the preferred method of obtaining Official Military Personnel File information. You need to make sure your performance (evaluations/fitness report) information is accurate, training information is accurate and your record should include any information that would impact an entitlement. Pay additional attention to your Performance Summary Record and the Physical Readiness Information Management System.

The Performance Summary Record provides a quick rundown of performance history off all evaluations/fitness reports in the Official Military Personnel File. Sailors should notify Navy Personnel Command (PERS-32) of any discrepancies between the Performance Summary Record and Official Military Personnel File.

The Physical Readiness Information Management System is the Navy’s official source for Sailors’ Physical Fitness Assessment data. PRIMS data also is verified against selection board and promotion board results at Navy Personnel Command. Commands are required to report their Physical Fitness Assessment data via PRIMS no later than 30 days after conducting the PFA. Sailors need to verify their data within 60 days so that any corrections can be made by the command fitness leader at the command level. Each Sailor must have a record for both Physical Fitness Assessment cycles in the year, even if the record reflects non-participation status due to deployment, individual augmentee, medical waiver, etc. After six months of Physical Fitness Assessment completion, record changes can only be made by Navy Personnel Command, which requires a letter from the individual’s commanding officer granting authorization to make the changes.

Chief Yeoman Brett Lentz, flag administration officer, checks the status of Carrier Strike Group (CVW) 11 personnel in the Flag Admin office aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68), Sept. 27, 2009. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group was on a routine deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Peter Merrill/Released)

Chief Yeoman Brett Lentz, flag administration officer, checks the status of Carrier Strike Group (CVW) 11 personnel in the Flag Admin office aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68), Sept. 27, 2009. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group was on a routine deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Peter Merrill/Released)

Review your personal awards in Navy Department Award Web Services available via https://awards.navy.mil.Navy Department Award Web Services is an online resource containing awards instructions, references, guidance and a personal awards database. All personal awards of Navy Achievement Award or higher must be submitted to Navy Department Award Web Services by the command’s award authority. Award information verified in NDAWS is provided to Navy Personnel Command for entry in the Sailor’s Official Military Personnel File. Sailors who discover missing awards or errors should contact their command’s award authority for assistance in correcting Navy Department Award Web Services. Awards sent to selection boards are now placed in the Official Military Personnel File as long as they have been entered in Navy Department Award Web Services.

Know how to make corrections and who to call if you have a question. If you find errors, or have questions about your Official Military Personnel File record, contact your servicing personnel office for assistance. Your personnel office is the primary source for preparing and submitting service record documents to Navy Personnel Command for updating the Official Military Personnel File and for entering transactions into the Electronic Service Record. The Privacy Act allows you to request corrections to your records, but the correction process depends on the type of correction to be made, and in most cases these corrections must initiate and be justified by the command and/or personnel office first. An illustrated guide is available onlineto aid you in the process and best practices in reviewing and correcting your record. In addition, a step by step guide also is available.

Lastly, if you are not near a Navy personnel office, you can call the NPC Customer Call Center (1-866-U-ASK-NPC) for help with your record issue.

What’s your most significant accomplishment? Let us know by commenting below.