What You Need to Know About the Fleet-Wide Sexual Assault Awareness Stand-down

By Capt. Paul Rosen
21st Century Sailor Office

These are the five things every Sailor needs to know about the Fleet-Wide Sexual Assault Awareness Stand-down.

Capt. Daniel Prince, chief of staff of Commander, Submarine Group (SUBGRU) 9, speaks to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor submarine senior leadership to kick off all-hands sexual assault awareness training as part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Apr. 11, 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ahron Arendes/Released)

Capt. Daniel Prince, chief of staff of Commander, Submarine Group (SUBGRU) 9, speaks to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor submarine senior leadership to kick off all-hands sexual assault awareness training as part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Apr. 11, 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ahron Arendes/Released)

 

1) There has been SAPR training throughout the fleet recently. Why are we having an additional stand-down?

Sexual assault continues to be a problem in Navy and throughout the Department of Defense. While we have implemented a number of important initiatives to address this crime, recent events, assessments and reports continue to demonstrate that we have much work to do. The sexual assault stand-down enables us to refocus our attention on this very serious challenge. It will allow purposeful and direct commander and leader engagements with Navy service members and civilian employees on SAPR principles and the climate of dignity and respect necessary in every work place across Navy.

2) What will the training include?

The training is a two-hour interactive discussion between Sailors and command leadership.  There will be videos by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens, though the majority of the training will be facilitated discussion.

3) When will the training take place?

The training began June 10. Active component units will complete the training by  July 1. Reserve component and deployed personnel will complete as much training as possible by July 1 and will complete the training no later than July 22.

4) Will Navy civilians take the training?

Navy civilians are invited and encouraged to participate in the training alongside their military co-workers.

5) What will Sailors get out of this training?

This training builds on the SAPR Fleet and SAPR Leadership Training and is designed to emphasize that positive culture change and the eradication of sexual assault in individual commands and in the Navy, is every Sailor’s responsibility – military personnel and civilian employees alike.

Join the Navy’s conversation about sexual assault on social media and help raise awareness by using #NavySAPR.