Happy Birthday, Marine Corps!

November 10th marks the birthday of the United States Marine Corps.  Here’s a brief history of their founding, from the USMC History Division web site:

On November 10, 1775, the Second Continental Congress meeting in Philadelphia passed a resolution stating that “two Battalions of Marines be raised” for service as landing forces with the fleet. This resolution established the Continental Marines and marked the birth date of the United States Marine Corps. Serving on land and at sea, these first Marines distinguished themselves in a number of important operations, including their first amphibious raid into the Bahamas in March 1776, under the command of Captain (later Major) Samuel Nicholas. The first commissioned officer in the Continental Marines, Nicholas remained the senior Marine officer throughout the American Revolution and is considered to be the first Marine Commandant. The Treaty of Paris in April 1783 brought an end to the Revolutionary War and as the last of the Navy’s ships were sold, the Continental Navy and Marines went out of existence.  Following the Revolutionary War and the formal re-establishment of the Marine Corps on 11 July 1798, Marines saw action in the quasi-war with France, landed in Santo Domingo, and took part in many operations against the Barbary pirates along the “Shores of Tripoli”.

The Navy and Marine Corps Team are a vital part of keeping America safe.  Together, your sea service team makes an amphibious force unlike any other with some of the most sophisticated and flexible warfighting capabilities on earth.  Here are just three of the capabilities and options your Navy and Marine Corps provide to America’s defense decision makers.

Landing Craft Air Cushioned (LCAC)

Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) 59, assigned to Assault Craft Unit (ACU) Five, departs the amphibious dock landing ship USS Rushmore (LSD 47) during certification exercise (CERTEX). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 3rd Class Shawnte Bryan/Released)

The Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) is a high-speed, over-the-beach fully amphibious landing craft, capable of carrying a 60-75 ton payload. It is used to transport the weapons systems, equipment, cargo and personnel of the assault elements of the Marine Air-Ground Task Force from ship to shore and across the beach. LCAC can carry heavy payloads, such as an M-1 tank, at high speeds. The LCAC payload capability and speed combine to significantly increase the ability of the Marine Ground Element to reach the shore. Air cushion technology allows this vehicle to reach more than 70 percent of the world’s coastline, while only about 15 percent of that coastline is accessible by conventional landing craft.

MV-22 Osprey

Flight Deck personnel conduct night operations with MV-22 Osprey aircraft aboard the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). Boxer is currently conducting operations off the coast of California. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Oscar Espinoza/RELEASED).

The Marine Corps is the lead service in the development of the Osprey. The Marine Corps version, the MV-22A, is an assault transport for troops, equipment and supplies, and is capable of operating from ships or from expeditionary airfields ashore.

Fleet Anti-Terrorism Security Team (FAST)

Marine Lance Cpl. Stevenson Jake from the 3rd Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Team (FAST), 1st Platoon, performs advances through a hatch in part of a vessel board search and seizure exercise aboard USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19). The FAST team was embarked providing security for U.S. 7th Fleet Staff personnel participating in multi-national exercise Key Resolve/Foal Eagle. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist (SW) Peter D. Lawlor/RELEASED)

Read about FAST and what they do here.