#WARFIGHTING – Surface Engineering Community

October is #Warfighting month focusing on Navy Warfighters, a fast and flexible force deployed worldwide to preserve peace, protect commerce, and deter aggression on, above, and below the sea. This is the sixth in a series of blogs highlighting different enlisted ratings found in your Navy. Here we take a look at Damage Controlman, Electrician’s Mate, Engineman, Gas Turbine Systems Technician – Electrical, Gas Turbine Systems Technician – Mechanical, Hull Technician, and Machinery Repairman, all important components of the Navy’s surface engineering community.

Damage Controlman – DC

Damage Controlman Firemen Ronald Monteroso and Brandon Williams replace an air filter aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55). “Our primary job is to ensure the safety of the crew if the ship catches on fire,” said Williams. “We also maintain all damage control and emergency equipment, and train the crew on how to react in case of an emergency,” added Monteroso. Williams is a native of Yorktown, Va.; Monteroso is from Austin, Texas. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kayla Jo Finley/ Released)

 

  • Operate, repair, and maintain installed firefighting systems and equipment, and chemical, biological, and radiological defense equipment.
  • Train shipboard personnel in the operation, maintenance, and repair of damage control systems and equipment, life-saving devices, and various firefighting methods.
  • Perform emergency repairs to decks, structures, and hulls by emergency pipe patching, plugging, and shoring.
  • Perform maintenance and repair of watertight closures and assorted fittings.
  • Perform emergency repairs to piping, fittings, and fixtures.
  • Act as the ships fire marshal and fire fighting leaders.
  • Train ship’s company in chemical, biological, and radiological defense.

 

Electrician’s Mate – EM

Electrician’s Mate 3rd Classes Megan Gant and Nelson Gomez trace a cable out using a cable tracer aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55). “Our job is important because we provide the ship with electricity,” said Gomez. Gant is a native of Norcross, Ga. and Gomez is a native of Miami. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kayla Jo Finley/ Released)

 

  • Install power and lighting circuits.
  • Repair distribution circuits.
  • Run wiring for lights and other equipment.
  • Maintain operating efficiency of distribution panels, switches, switchboards, controllers, voltage regulators, current transformers and voltage transformers.
  • Maintain operating efficiency of electric motors.
  • Repair electrical equipment and appliances.
  • Install and maintain storage batteries.
  • Inspect, maintain, test, and repair electrical power equipment.
  • Maintenance and repair of shipboard elevator systems.
  • Interpret electrical sketches, diagrams, and blueprints.
  • Maintenance and repair of various propulsion and auxiliary control consoles.
  • Connect electrical power machinery and electrical power equipment.


Engineman – EN

Engineman 3rd Class Vanessa Tavares of Boston drains water out of an expansion tank in the Auxiliary Machinery Room One aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55). “Enginemen contribute to the warfighting effort by making sure all air conditioning units are running to ensure they properly cool down all the electric systems,” said Tavares. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kayla Jo Finley/ Released)

 

  • Align piping systems for oil, water, and air for controlling the operation of diesel engines used for ship propulsion and service system.
  • Control operation of diesel generators used to produce electrical power.
  • Clean, adjust, test and perform other preventive maintenance on a ship’s auxiliary boilers, main engines, diesel generators and other auxiliary machinery including steering engines, elevators, winches, pumps and associated valves.
  • Operate and maintain desalinization plants (distilling plants) to make fresh water from seawater.
  • Maintain refrigeration plants, air conditioning systems and galley equipment.
  • Repair or replace valves, pumps, heat exchangers, compressors, steam turbines and hydraulic or pneumatic control devices.
  • Operate and maintain small boats.
  • Make entries in and analyze machinery operating records and reports.


Gas Turbine System Technician Electrical – GSE

Gas Turbine System Technician (Electrical) Fireman Tuan Guyen of Houston, Texas, measures the voltage on an engine controller aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55). “Without gas turbine system technicians all electrical components of compulsion would not work properly,” said Guyen, describing how he supports the warfighting mission. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kayla Jo Finley/ Released)

 

  • Operate electric plant main and propulsion control equipment.
  • Locate circuit failures and replace parts.
  • Measure current, voltage and resistance.
  • Test for shorts, grounds and continuity.
  • Test protective circuitry.
  • Test, service and replace batteries.
  • Perform preventive maintenance on digital data equipment and control and monitoring circuits.
  • Measure insulation resistance.
  • Repair electrical/electronic cables, wiring and connectors.
  • Maintain alarm, indicating and warning systems.
  • Maintain and repair gas turbine engines and auxiliary equipment.
  • Work with blueprints, schematics and charts.
  • Perform administrative procedures related to gas turbine propulsion system operation and maintenance.
  • Perform work area inspections.
  • Operate standard test equipment.
  • Stop engines and checking for proper performance.
  • Replace and adjust operating tolerance of contacts, micro switches, relay switches, pressure switches and temperature switches.


Gas Turbine System Technician Mechanical – GSM

Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) Fireman Kathren Shost cleans out a gas generator after a wash down in Main Engine Room Two aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55). “The ship can’t go anywhere without gas turbine system technicians,” said Shost. “We are critical to completing the mission of the ship by providing the service to make the engines run properly.” Shost is a native of Watertown, N.Y. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kayla Jo Finley/ Released)

 

  • Maintain and repairing gas turbine engines and auxiliary equipment.
  • Work with blueprints, schematics and charts.
  • Perform administrative procedures related to gas turbine propulsion system operation and maintenance.
  • Perform work area inspections.
  • Test lubricating oil and distillate fuels for contamination, neutralization and precipitation.
  • Operate standard test equipment.
  • Stop engines and checking proper performance.
  • Replace and adjust operating tolerance of contacts, micro switches, relay switches, pressure switches and temperature switches.
  • Operate electric plant control and main propulsion equipment.
  • Operate pumps, turning gear, air compressors, oil purification system, low-pressure air dehydrators and engineering control systems.
  • Perform preventive maintenance on ship’s fuel system and air system.
  • Maintain seawater service system, waste drain system, oil purification system and manually operated valves.
  • Use hoisting and lifting devices and maintaining special tools.
  • Maintain and operate ship’s service gas turbine generators and support systems.
  • Maintain and control ship’s service steam water chemistry.
  • Maintain the controllable pitch propeller system.


Hull Maintenance Technician – HT

Hull Maintenance Technician 3rd Class Don Smallcanyon and Damage Controlman 3rd Class Jason Anderson replace a swivel joint on an aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) hose wheel aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55). “Our jobs (damage controlman and hull maintenance technician) are important to the warfighting effort because we work on equipment that saves lives,” said Anderson. Smallcanyon is a native of Flagstaff, Ariz. and Anderson is a native of Riverside, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kayla Jo Finley/ Released)

 

  • Install, maintain and repair valves, piping, plumbing system fittings and fixtures, and marine sanitation systems.
  • Repair decks, structures and hulls by welding, brazing, riveting and caulking.
  • Examine and test welds and various shipboard structures using radiological, ultrasonic and magnetic particle testing equipment.
  • Fabricate with light and heavy gauge metal such as aluminum, stainless steel, sheet copper and brass, steel, sheet and corrugated iron.
  • Heat treat, hot and cold form of metals.
  • Pipe cutting, threading and assembly.
  • Repair installed ventilation ducting.
  • Repair metal, wood and fiberglass boats.
  • Install and repair insulation and lagging.
  • Operate marine sanitation systems.


Machinery Repairman – MR

Boring, Ore. native, Machinery Repairman 3rd Class Jose Huerta repairs a magnetic gun aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55). “Machinery repairmen manufacture and fabricate any type of engineering gear the ship uses,” said Huerta. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kayla Jo Finley/ Released)

 

  • Repair and operate auxiliary machinery.
  • Calculate time and material needed for machine shop work and the repairing of auxiliary machinery.
  • Draw sketches and prepare specifications for replacement parts.
  • Work from sketches and specifications to produce replacement parts.
  • Operate machine shop equipment, such as lathes, drill presses, shapers, bench grinders, milling machines, boring mills, power hacksaws and computer numerically controlled machinery.
  • Work with precision measuring instruments such as micrometers, depth gauges, verniers, calipers, gauge blocks, protractors and dial indicators.
  • Engrave metal and other materials.
  • Perform electroplating and flame spraying operations.

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Learn more about all the enlisted ratings with our Owners and Operators Manual.