#WARFIGHTING – The Submarine Community

October is #Warfighting month focusing on Navy Warfighters, a fast and flexible force deployed worldwide to preserve peace, protect commerce, and deter aggression on, above, and below the sea. This is another in a series of blogs highlighting different enlisted ratings found in your Navy. Here we take at jobs that are key to making a submarine mission a success, the submarine community. All submarine ratings are members of an elite community consisting of highly professional, well-trained personnel.

Culinary Specialist, Submarines – CS (SS)

Culinary Specialist Seaman Apprentice Teron Sampson of Forestville, Md., who has served aboard USS Alexandria (SSN 757) for nearly a year is assigned to the Supply Department on board the Los Angeles class attack submarine loads food stores into the crew’s mess. Sampson said his contributions to the warfighting effort is to “provide the best service to the Sailors attached to Alexandria.” (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class(SW/EXW) Jason J. Perry/ released)

 

The CS (SS) focuses on dining and berthing for personnel. As a CS (SS) you also play a vital role in overall personnel morale. Some typical duties include:

  • Prepare menus and ordering the quantities and types of food items.
  • Operate kitchen and dining facilities.
  • Keep records for food supplies and financial budgets.
  • Serve as personal food service specialists on admiral’s staffs and for the commanding officer aboard ship or at shore bases.
  • Operate and manage living quarters aboard submarines and work at shore based motel/hotel type quarters.

Electronics Technician (ET)

Navigational Electronics Technician Seaman Richard Loar, Beaverton, MI. USS Ohio (SSGN 726). Navigational Electronics Technician Seaman Richard Loar remove the front panel of a central atmosphere monitoring system to perform maintenance aboard the USS Ohio (SSGN 726) at Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam. “Navigational Electronics Technicians from a submarine help with the Navy’s warfighting mission,” said Loar, “by safely navigating the submarine and keeping vital electronic systems operational allowing a submarine to accomplish its mission.” (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

 

Electronic Technician’s maintain and repair electronics equipment such as radar, communication and navigation equipment. ETs comprise the basis of the ship’s Combat Systems department aboard ships and are responsible for maintaining the ship’s readiness for combat operations.

The duties performed by ETs include:

  • Responsible for electronic equipment used to send and receive messages.
  • Detect enemy planes and ships, and determine target distance.
  • Maintain, repair, calibrate, tune, and adjust all electronic equipment used for communications, detection and tracking, recognition and identification, navigation, and electronic countermeasures.
  • Use and maintain hand tools and portable power tools.

Fire Control Technician (FT)

Fire Control Technician 2nd Class Donnell McMillen, right, and Fire Control Technician Seaman Alexander Santosus troubleshoot a missile tube indicator in the Weapons Launch console aboard the USS Charlotte (SSN 766) at Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam. According to McMillen, “Fire Technicians from a submarine help with the Navy’s warfighting mission by gathering intelligence from a stealth platform, enabling the nation to be better equipped to fight the war.” (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

 

Fire Control Technician (FT) Submarines serve on board multiple classes of submarines and specialize in combat systems. They are responsible for maintenance and operation of advanced electronic equipment (in regards to guided-missile systems, and underwater weapons) used in the submarine weapons systems.

The duties performed by FTs include:

  • Maintain, repair, calibrate, tune, and adjust all electronic equipment used for combat systems.
  • Support operation and basic maintenance of submarine weapon control systems.
  • Perform organizational and intermediate level maintenance on submarine combat control systems, equipment, and associated combat control systems test equipment.
  • Operate submarine combat control systems.
  • Test submarine combat control systems.
  • Operate and maintain combat control systems associated systems.
  • Participate in weapons handling functions.
  • Operate and maintain non-tactical computer systems and peripherals.
  • Use and maintain hand tools and portable power tools.

Information Systems Technician Submarines (ITS)

Information Systems Technician Submarines 1st Class James Bowler swaps a failed hard drive on an application server aboard the USS Charlotte (SSN 766) at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Bowler said Information Systems Technicians Submarines help with the Navy’s warfighting mission by maintaining and managing the submarine’s classified and unclassified local networks to ensure integrity and availability of information required to complete mission tasking, as well as providing the capability for interconnectivity between ship’s systems, email and web browsing for the crew. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

 

The Information Systems Technician Submarines of the 21st century perform core and specialty functions of network administration; install applications and peripherals, troubleshoot user problems, and provide assistance with the use of computer hardware and software including printers, word-processors, electronic mail systems, and operating systems; conduct system backups and restores; utilize knowledge of database management systems to maintain, administer, test, and implement computer databases; and work with General Service (GENSER), unclassified, and Special Intelligence (SI) systems including Global Command and Control System-Maritime (GCCS-M), Navy Tactical Command Support Systems (NTCSS), Tactical Support Center (TSC) data processing systems, Integrated Conning Systems (ICS), Integrated Communications and Advanced Networks (ICAN), Submarine Wide-Area-Networks (SWAN), and submarine’s control or engineering systems.

The duties performed by ITSs include:

  • Design, install, operate and maintain state-of-the-art information systems technology including local and wide area networks, mainframe, mini and microcomputer systems and associated peripheral devices.
  • Write programs to handle the collection, manipulation and distribution of data for a wide variety of applications and requirements.
  • Perform the functions of a computer system analyst.
  • Operate and coordinate telecommunications systems including automated networks and the full spectrum of data links and circuits.
  • Transmit, receive, operate, monitor, control and process all forms of telecommunications through various transmission media including global networks.
  • Apply diagnostic, corrective and recovery techniques to all facets of the integrated information systems.
  • Maintain all necessary logs, files and publications at the communications center.
  • Provide telecommunications and computer-related training and assistance to a wide variety of personnel.

Logistics Specialist,  Submarines – LS (SS)

Logistics Specialist 3rd Class David Terrones of Fresno, Calif., conducts a depot level repairable inventory aboard the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Helena (SSN 725). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Todd A. Schaffer / Released)

 

Logistics Specialist Sailors manage inventories of repair parts/general supplies and distribute mail for ships, squadrons, and shore-based activities. They procure, receive, store and issue material and repair components. They utilize financial accounting and database systems to perform inventory and financial management functions. Additionally, they sort and distribute all official and personal mail, manage money order and stamp inventories, and maintain financial and inventory reports.

The duties performed by LSs include:

  • Manage and operate Navy post offices, ashore or afloat.
  • Maintain financial records and accounting systems.
  • Maintain inventory databases for material stocked in shore based warehouses and ship storerooms.
  • Perform duties associated with hazardous material control and management.
  • Organize and maintaining databases, correspondence files, and reports.
  • Maintain logistics and financial publications and CD-ROM libraries.
  • Sort and distribute all classes of mail and parcel post.
  • Process and dispatch mail.
  • Direct the route and transportation of mail.
  • Perform counter operations similar to those performed in United States Postal Service offices, such as selling stamps, handling money orders, preparing claims, tracers and inquiries.
  • Prepare and maintain postal records and reports.
  • Requisition, control, and maintain postal supplies and equipment.
  • Maintain security for registered, certified and other special classes of mail.
  • Maintain inventory databases for material stocked in shore based warehouses and ship storerooms.

Machinist’s Mate, Submarines – MM (SS)

Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class (SS) Jon-Michael Hamrick of Kings Mountain, N.C. who has served aboard USS Alexandria (SSN 757) for the past two years, changes out the in-line filter for the hydraulic supply system. Hamrick is assigned to the Engineering Department of Alexandria and is proud of his contribution to the warfighting effort as he “fixes and repairs equipment to keep the boat on task and on mission.” (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class(SW/EXW) Jason J. Perry/ released)

 

Machinist’s Mates (Submarines) receive extensive training in the operation and maintenance of hydraulic power plants, hoists and cylinders, oxygen generators, atmosphere control equipment, refrigeration systems, emergency diesel engines, pressurized air systems, plumbing systems and submarine weapons and weapons delivery systems. Responsible for the operation, routine care, and repair of submarine auxiliary and weapons systems as well as fire fighting and damage control equipment, these mechanical specialists are a vital element in the day-to-day operation and combat survivability of the submarine.

The Machinist’s Mate (Submarines) focuses on mechanical work. Typical duties include:

  • Manufacturing and storing oxygen.
  • Removing airborne waste products such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons.
  • Cleaning, adjusting, testing and performing preventive maintenance on submarine emergency diesel engines, mast and antenna hoists, hatches and watertight doors.
  • Repairing or replacing valves, filters, pumps, compressors and hydraulic or pneumatic control devices.
  • Operating, troubleshooting and repairing ship’s refrigeration systems using specialized equipment after receiving EPA certification.
  • Removing and installing as well as securing and reinstalling weapons components from containers.
  • Testing equipment using voltmeters, ammeters, meggers and ohmmeters.
  • Testing and replacing portable cable, self-contained relays, lamps and fuses.
  • Locating and identifying components and assemblies of electronic equipment using technical maintenance publications.
  • Checking weapons storage, security and alarm systems.
  • Maintaining equipment work logs and torpedo record books.
  • Identifying torpedo components, tools and test equipment as well as ordering replacements.
  • Using and caring for common hand tools, special tools and soldering equipment.
  • Performing preventive and corrective maintenance on hydraulic and pneumatic systems and components associated with launching systems.
  • Serving as team members performing inspections and final close-out checks on weapons.
  • Tracing mechanical/electrical circuits on schematics and drawings.

Missile Technician (MT)

Senior Chief Missile Technician Wyatt Harris, center, Blue Team assistant navigator aboard the ballistic-missile submarine USS Florida (SSBN 728), supervises Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Gordon Patterson and Machinist’s Mate Fireman Blake Hornbuckle as they simulate driving a submarine in the dive simulator at the Trident Training Facility. The dive simulator offers off crew submariners navigation training while ashore. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James Kimber/Released)

 

Missile Technicians (Submarines) receive extensive training in the operation and maintenance of advanced electronic equipment and computers and electro-mechanical support systems used in submarine strategic weapons systems. Responsible for the assembly, maintenance and repair of nuclear capable ballistic missiles carried on submarines and their associated advanced electronics and electromechanical navigation and targeting systems, MTs are a vital element in the maintenance of strategic deterrence so vital to the security of the United States.

The duties, technical and manual, performed by Missile Technicians include:

  • Maintain ballistic missiles and their launching systems.
  • Maintain related launching systems including high-pressure air and hydraulic systems.
  • Operate and maintain digital computers.
  • Maintain operating efficiency of electrical distribution panels, switches, switchboards, controllers, voltage regulators, current transformers, rectifiers and voltage transformers within the fleet ballistic missile weapons systems.
  • Test and repair ballistic guidance systems.
  • Operate, maintain and adjust optical measuring equipment.
  • Test, align and adjust missiles and components
  • Repair missiles and related components.
  • Test, align, adjust, calibrate and repair support handling equipment.
  • Stow missiles and components.
  • Maintain logs.
  • Prepare reports.
  • Provide security in missile launch spaces aboard submarines.
  • Maintain and operate ballistic missile fire control systems and equipment for Trident submarines.
  • Maintain control of classified material.
  • Monitor and ensure security of weapons system components and material.

Sonar Technician, Submarines (STS)

Sonar Technician Submarine 2nd Class Kenneth Pichon, right, and Sonar Technician Submarine Seaman Edwin Silva troubleshoot a trailing sonar sensor aboard the USS Charlotte (SSN 766) at Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam. “Sonar Technician Submariners help with the Navy’s warfighting mission by being the eyes and ears of the submarine,” says Silva, “constantly watching and listening for enemy activity, thus keeping the ship and the crew safe and enabling the submarine to complete it’s mission.” (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

 

Sonar Technician (STS) Submarines serve on board multiple classes of submarines and specialize in combat systems. They are responsible for all operational and administrative aspects of the submarine’s computer and control mechanisms used for underwater surveillance and scientific data collection.

The duties performed by STS’s include:

  • Maintain, repair, calibrate, tune, and adjust all electronic equipment used for underwater surveillance and scientific data collection.
  • Support operation and basic maintenance of underwater surveillance and scientific data collection systems.
  • Perform organizational and intermediate level maintenance on underwater surveillance and scientific data collection systems, equipment, and associated combat control systems test equipment.
  • Operate underwater surveillance and scientific data collection systems.
  • Test underwater surveillance and scientific data collection systems.
  • Operate and maintain combat control systems associated systems.
  • Use and maintain hand tools and portable power tools.

Yeoman, Submarines – YN (SS)

Yeoman 2nd Class Marcos Perez, front, and Yeoman 1st Class Sheldon Augustine update the crew database checked aboard the USS Ohio (SSGN 726) at Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam. “Yeoman help in the Navy’s warfighting mission by providing superior customer service, and always strive to know the changes in regulation and policy to keep the crew informed,” says Perez. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor/Released)

 

Yeoman (Submarines) receive extensive training in administrative support to officers and enlisted personnel. Responsible for information related to Navy occupations, general education, requirements for promotion, and rights and benefits, Yeoman (Submarines) keep the ship’s daily schedule running by receiving visitors, answering the telephone, sorting mail, organizing files and operating modern office equipment. Yeoman also order and distribute clerical supplies.

The submarine YN focuses on Executive Administration. As a YN(SS) you also play a vital role in personnel support. Some typical duties include:

  • Prepare and type correspondence and reports.
  • Organize and maintain files.
  • Receive office visitors and handling telephone communications.
  • Operate computers, word processing, duplicating, audio-recording and other office machines.
  • Perform administrative functions for legal proceedings.
  • Serve as office managers.
  • Perform other various clerical and administrative duties.
  • Interview personnel.
  • Write official letters and correspondence.
  • Maintain enlisted/officer service records.

 

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Learn more about all the enlisted ratings with our Owners and Operators Manual.

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