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Construction Mechanic 3rd Class Owen Boehm, left, and Construction Mechanic Constructionman Brandon Brooks, right, both assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3 Det. Sigonella, rebuild the rear axle of a 420D backhoe.  "CMs keep all equipment ready to go. It's always up and running for the mission," said Boehm.  U.S Navy photo by Utilitiesman 3rd Class Jennifer Stewart (RELEASED)
Construction Mechanic 3rd Class Owen Boehm, left, and Construction Mechanic Constructionman Brandon Brooks, right, both assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3 Det. Sigonella, rebuild the rear axle of a 420D backhoe. "CMs keep all equipment ready to go. It's always up and running for the mission," said Boehm. U.S Navy photo by Utilitiesman 3rd Class Jennifer Stewart (RELEASED)

#WARFIGHTING – The SEABEES

October is #Warfighting month focusing on Navy Warfighters, a fast and flexible force deployed worldwide to preserve peace, protect commerce, and deter aggression on, above, and below the sea. This is another in a series of blogs highlighting different enlisted ratings found in your Navy.  For over 70 years, the men and women of the Naval Construction Force have been giving their all to protect our Nation. Here we take at the jobs that make the  SEABEE community unparalleled in their ability to build and fight.

Builder (BU)

Builder 3rd Class Timothy Fitzgerald, a Seabee assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74, uses a level to ensure the proper placement of an interior wall inside of an ammunition warehouse under construction at Tangen Pier in Okinawa, Japan. Once complete, the PEB will include a forklift charging bay, administrative space and conference room and will greatly increase the effectiveness of ammunition movement operations on the island. “Builders in the Seabees are involved in so many different types of construction projects from SWA-HUTs in Afghanistan to schools in Africa and even ammunition storage facilities in Japan,” said Fitzgerald, a native of Tonawanda, N.Y. “Wherever the Navy needs us to build, we are ready and willing.” (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Lindsey/Released)

Builders make up the largest segment of the Naval Construction Force. They work as carpenters, plasters, roofers, concrete finishers, masons, painters, bricklayers, and cabinet makers.

The duties performed by BUs:

  • Build and repair wood, masonry concrete, and steel structures.
  • Install interior finish work, including installing sheet rock, paneling or ceramic tile walls and installing ceiling and floor tile, millwork and trim.
  • Operate carpentry, cabinet-making, and tool and equipment repair shops.
  • Build forms for concrete construction.
  • Mix, place and finish concrete.
  • Operate concrete batch plants, portable concrete mixers and other concrete finishing equipment and tools.
  • Build wharves, bridges and other heavy timber structures.
  • Read and interpret blueprints and preparing sketches for projects.
  • Make estimates of material, labor, and equipment requirements.

Construction Electrician (CE)

Construction Electrician 2nd Class Dale Grawet connects wires in a new panel box in a building as part of a camp improvement project. “We maintain the power source that drives the mission and power the quality of life,” said Grawet. U.S. Navy photo by Utilitiesman 3rd Class Krystal Santanillo (RELEASED)

Construction Electrician’s build, maintain, and operate power production facilities and electrical distribution systems for Naval installations.

The duties performed by CEs:

  • Install, maintain and repair telephone systems and high and low voltage electrical power distribution networks, both overhead and underground.
  • Splice and lay cables, erect poles, string wires and install transformers and distribution panels.
  • Install, repair and maintain street lighting, fire alarm, public address, inter-office and telephone switchboard systems.
  • Install, maintain and repair interior wiring for lighting and electrical equipment.
  • Work with batteries, electric motors, relays, solenoids and switches.
  • Operate electrical generators.
  • Read and interpret blueprints and preparing sketches for projects.
  • Make estimates of material, labor, and equipment requirements.

Construction Mechanic (CM)

Construction Mechanic 3rd Class Owen Boehm, left, and Construction Mechanic Constructionman Brandon Brooks, right, both assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3 Det. Sigonella, rebuild the rear axle of a 420D backhoe. “CMs keep all equipment ready to go. It’s always up and running for the mission,” said Boehm. U.S Navy photo by Utilitiesman 3rd Class Jennifer Stewart (RELEASED)

Construction Mechanics repair and maintain heavy construction and automotive equipment including, buses, dump trucks, bulldozers, rollers, cranes, backhoes, pile drivers, and tactical vehicles. CMs also prepare detailed maintenance records and cost control data and acquire parts.

The duties performed by CMs:

  • Diagnose and troubleshoot equipment failures.
  • Repair and maintain diesel and gasoline engines.
  • Adjust and repair ignition, fuel, electrical, hydraulic and steering systems.
  • Maintain and repair chassis, frames and bodies.
  • Work with hoisting and jacking equipment, power tools, measuring instruments, gauges and meters.
  • Lubricating equipment.
  • Maintain and repair tires, batteries, brakes and valves.
  • Perform shop management functions such as maintenance scheduling and spare parts inventory control.
  • Make estimates of material, labor, and equipment requirements.

Engineering Aide (EA)

Engineering Aide 3rd Class Irwin Tan, a native of San Diego, surveys a line during a training session aboard the camp. “We provide engineering support to the host nation by obtaining and converting field notes into topographic maps; making control surveys; staking out building corners on project sites; prepare, edit and reproduce construction drawings; and establish quality control system testing on soil, concrete and bituminous materials,” said Tan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Steven Myers/Released)

Engineering Aides assist construction engineers in developing final construction plans. They conduct land surveys; prepare maps, sketches, drawings and blueprints; estimate costs; perform quality assurance tests on common construction materials such as soils, concrete and asphalt; and perform other engineering technician functions.

The duties performed by EAs:

  • Conduct location surveys for roads, airfields, pipelines, ditches, buildings, drainage structures and waterfront construction.
  • Prepare hydrographic, topographic and triangulation drawings and maps.
  • Compute the volume of bulk materials (concrete, bituminous mixtures and earthwork) from drawings and specifications.
  • Lay out all types of construction work.
  • Operate and maintain various types of precision surveying and laboratory test instruments and equipment.
  • Prepare architectural, mechanical, electrical, and civil drawings and sketches.
  • Design grading and drainage systems.
  • Conduct concrete, soil and asphalt tests;
  • Conduct quality control inspections for all types of construction projects.
  • Prepare network analyses, charts and graphs.
  • Read and interpret blueprints and preparing sketches for projects.
  • Make estimates of material, labor, and equipment requirements.

Equipment Operator (EO)

Equipment Operator 2nd Class Alejandro Lopez operates a backhoe to prepare for the construction of a multi-purpose building. “EOs are essential for movement of civil engineer support equipment (CESE). We are the backbone of Seabee battalions,” said Lopez. U.S. Navy photo by Utilitiesman 3rd Class Jennifer Stewart (RELEASED)

Equipment Operators operate heavy transportation and construction equipment including, trucks, bulldozers, backhoes, graders, forklifts, cranes and asphalt equipment.

The duties performed by EOs:

  • Operate a wide variety of heavy-duty, self-propelled construction equipment for projects including, building construction, roadway construction, Pier construction, grading and excavation.
  • Perform minor maintenance on equipment to ensure safe, efficient operation.
  • Serve as members of a crane crew to rig cable assemblies and change attachments for various lifting and pile-driving operations.
  • Prepare operational reports on equipment.
  • Operate rock crushing and well-drilling equipment.
  • Perform as blasters for construction projects.
  • Read and interpret blueprints and preparing sketches for projects.
  • Make estimates of material, labor, and equipment requirements.

Steelworkers (SW)

Steelworker 3rd Class Jeffrey Connell, a Seabee assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74, uses an arc welder to repair a piece of a equipment in the steel shop on Camp Shields, Okinawa. Steelworkers often provide welding support for the mechanics and equipment operators by maintaining all the tactical vehicles and construction equipment assets of the battalion keeping them ready to deploy to support Navy and Joint Forces world wide. “€œI love steel working in the Seabees because I like the hands on challenges, no job is ever the same as the last,€” said Connel, a native of Lancaster, Ohio. €“When you’re a steel worker you have to flexible and ready to support different types of missions for different people.” (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Lindsey/Released)

Steelworkers rig and operate special equipment used to build metal structures. They lay out and fabricate structural steel and sheet metal and work with concrete-reinforcing steel bars. They perform welding and cutting operations, read blueprints and use special tools.

The duties performed by SWs:

  • Erect steel bridges, tanks, buildings, towers and pre-engineered structures.
  • Fabricate, erect, install, fit, weld and bolt structural steel shapes, plates and the built-up sections used in heavy construction.
  • Laying out, fabricating and installing sheet metal assemblies and systems.
  • Perform welding and metal cutting operations.
  • Install and reinforce steel in concrete structures.
  • Read and interpret blueprints and preparing sketches for projects.
  • Make estimates of materials, labor, and equipment requirements.

Utilitiesman (UT)

Utilitiesman 3rd Class Ridge Roy, a native of Honolulu, Hawaii, prepares to turn off the water to a water heater in the camp’s showers. “Utilitesman attached to a battalion build and maintain showers; test and treat water sources for use; and maintain air conditioning units,” said Roy. “Overall, we assist the troops in keeping their morale high as they perform their missions.” (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Steven Myers/Released)

Utilitiesman work with plumbing, heating, steam, compressed air, fuel storage, and distribution systems. Their work also includes water treatment and distribution systems, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and sewage collecting and disposal facilities at Navy shore installations around the world.

The duties performed by UTs:

  • Install and maintain systems requiring plumbing and pipe-fitting skills.
  • Install, operate and repair heating, piping, ventilation and air conditioning systems.
  • Operate and maintain water and wastewater systems and treatment plants.
  • Identify and carry out procedures to limit or minimize the adverse effects of environmental pollution.
  • Read and interpret blueprints and preparing sketches for projects.
  • Make estimates of material, labor, and equipment requirements.

 

Follow the conversation on Twitter – #Warfighting

Learn more about all the enlisted ratings with our Owners and Operators Manual.

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3 comments

  1. We build – We fight.. Navy Seabees have been doing this in every war since WWII. Self contained construction crews that will build the difficult immediately, the impossible in hours and miracles by request. We defend what we build with the same zest that goes into the construction. Once a Seabee, always a Seabee..

  2. CMH3 USNMCB Ten, Once a BEE always a BEE ! CAN DO !

  3. I just went to The Vet Center , Our Pot luck feed night , and a new face so I welcomed Her a W O Chanuk Chopper Pilot from the two wars in the sand , and she said luv the Seabees they get it done !

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