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Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Christopher C. Hippler, left, and Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class Mark Henderson conduct a watch aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77).
Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Christopher C. Hippler, left, and Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class Mark Henderson conduct a watch aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77).

#WARFIGHTING – Information Dominance Team

October is #Warfighting month focusing on Navy Warfighters, a fast and flexible force deployed worldwide to preserve peace, protect commerce, and deter aggression on, above, and below the sea. This is another in a series of blogs highlighting different enlisted ratings found in your Navy. A vital component of winning against any agressor is information.  The Navy has a team of highly skilled and expertly trained information warriors who ensure Information Dominance.  Here are the ratings that make up this team.

Aerographer’s Mate (AG)

Aerographer's Mate 2nd Class Darrel Osborne, left, and Aerographer's Mate 3rd Class Mindie Cobos, assigned to the amphibious assault ship, USS Makin Island (LHD 8) operate a PMQ-3 hand-held anemeter and a digital weather tracker to measure wind direction and speed above the flight deck prior to flight operations. Makin Island, along with Marines assigned to the 13 Marine Expeditionary Unit, are en route to San Francisco to participate in the 2012 San Francisco fleet Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ronald Gutridge/Released)
Aerographer’s Mate 2nd Class Darrel Osborne, left, and Aerographer’s Mate 3rd Class Mindie Cobos, assigned to the amphibious assault ship, USS Makin Island (LHD 8) operate a PMQ-3 hand-held anemeter and a digital weather tracker to measure wind direction and speed above the flight deck prior to flight operations. Makin Island, along with Marines assigned to the 13 Marine Expeditionary Unit, are en route to San Francisco to participate in the 2012 San Francisco fleet Week. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ronald Gutridge/Released)

 

Aerographer’s Mates are the Navy’s meteorological and oceanographic experts, trained in the sciences of meteorology, physical oceanography, and hydrography.  They learn to observe, analyze, and predict weather characteristics and phenomena, and measure the characteristics of the ocean from the sea surface to the bottom.  They apply this information to decision-making in every warfare area and in every operational venue to ensure our forces operate safely and effectively – achieving decision superiority.

The duties performed by AGs include:

  • Collecting, recording and analyzing weather and oceanographic information.
  • Issuing weather/ocean forecasts and warnings based on interpretation of collected data and numerical model predictions.
  • Conducting weather/oceanographic briefings in direct support of anti-submarine warfare, mine warfare, strike warfare, and other activities.
  • Using, testing, calibrating and performing minor and preventive maintenance on meteorological instruments including satellite receivers.
  • Operating, programming and maintaining computers and related equipment.
  • Operating small boats and personal watercraft outfitted with positioning and sonar systems to collect hydrographic data for use on nautical charts.
  • Operating unmanned underwater vehicles to collect sea bottom characteristics in support of navigation safety and mine warfare.

Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) (CTI)

“My job is to ensure that linguists in the Navy get the level of training they need to meet proficiency standards.”€ - Cryptologic Technician (Interpretative) 1st Class Sarah Malin.

 

Cryptologic Technicians (Interpretive) are the Navy’s linguists. They specialize in analysis of adversary developments, radiotelephone communications and preparation of statistical studies and technical reports requiring knowledge of a foreign language.

The duties performed by CTIs include:

  • Operate sophisticated state-of-the-art electronic radio receivers, recording devices, computer terminals and associated peripherals in the communications signals environment.
  • Operate sophisticated, computer-assisted information systems.
  • Work with classified material.
  • Translate, interpret and transcribe foreign language communications data.
  • Analyze and report highly technical information of strategic and tactical importance to fleet commanders and national intelligence agencies.
  • Perform temporary duty aboard a variety of naval surface and subsurface vessels and aircraft.

Cryptologic Technician (Maintenance) (CTM)

FORT MEADE, Md. (Oct. 17, 2012) Cryptologic Technician (Maintenance) 2nd Class Jacob Watkins, assigned to Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Maryland, performs corrective maintenance on a computer in the Public Affairs Office.

 

The Cryptologic Technician Maintenance branch offers a career in the installation, configuration, diagnosis, and repair of state-of-the-art electronic, computer, and network hardware and software systems.

The duties performed by CTMs include:

  • Perform hardware and software isolation and repair of state-of-the-art electronic, computer and network equipment and related systems using complex test and analysis equipment, diagnostic software, hand tools and technical publications.
  • Perform computer and electronic system hardware and software installation, configuration and modification.
  • Analyze the configuration and monitor the operation of computer telecommunications and networking systems.
  • Maintain fleet cryptologic permanent and carry-on direct support systems required in special land, sea surface and subsurface operations.

Cryptologic Technician (Networks) (CTN)

“As a whole we support the intel communications for many venues and through a triad approach of computer network defense, exploitation and attack.” – Cryptologic Technician (Networks) 2nd Class Walter Cottrell.

Cryptologic Technician Networks perform a variety of duties associated with computer network operations across global networks. A combination of technical and analytical computer network skills provides the situational awareness required to plan and execute information operations (IO) actions/ counter-actions. Initial training is located in Pensacola, Florida.

The duties performed by CTNs include:

  • Provide technical expertise in network-centric operations.
  • Detect, protect, react and respond to threats against Navy networks.
  • Defend against external and internal threats through in-depth technical and nontechnical methods.
  • Computer Network Risk Mitigation.
  • Network Vulnerability Assessments and Incident Response/Reconstruction.
  • Active computer network defense, access tool development and computer/network forensics.

Cryptologic Technician (Collection) (CTR)

“We’re focused on signals collection and analysis.” – Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 2nd Class Kai Harmon.

CTRs perform a variety of duties worldwide at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands, aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines and Naval Special Warfare. Duties include performing collection, analysis and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, video display terminals and electronic/magnetic tape recorders.

The duties performed by CTRs include:

  • Provid in-depth analysis on a variety of complex digital communications signals using sophisticated communications equipment and computer technology to provide critical intelligence information.
  • Provid analysis and technical guidance and specialized information to weapons systems while assigned to ships and submarines.
  • Possible assignment to a three-year tour of duty to selected ships homeported at Norfolk, Va., Mayport, Fla., San Diego, CA., Everett, WA, Hawaii and Japan or to P-3 aircraft based in Misawa, Japan, Whidbey Island, WA, Fallon, NV.
  • Operate sophisticated state-of-the-art strategic and tactical signals collection and analysis systems.
  • Locate ships, aircraft and submarines using sophisticated direction finding technology.
  • Originate reports and briefs for operational commanders both ashore and afloat.

Cryptologic Technician (Technical) (CTT)

“We perform a variety of specialized duties based on the collection and processing of radar signals, which provides vital information to units around the world.” – Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 2nd Class Jessica Cummins.

 

Cryptologic Technicians (Technical) perform a variety of specialized duties associated with the collection and processing of airborne, shipborne, and land-based radar signals. They operate electronic intelligence receiving and direction finding systems, digital recording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment. Systems they operate produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar guided weapons systems. Additionally, intelligence derived from collection and processing update national databases which are crucial to tactical and strategic units throughout the world.

The duties performed by CTTs include:

  • Operate sophisticated collection and analysis systems on surface, subsurface, and airborne platforms, as well as at shore locations worldwide.
  • Provid tactical support and Indications and Warnings (I&W) of emerging and potential threats against Naval units.
  • Work with highly classified and technical material in support of national security.
  • Track surface and airborne targets of interest to determine defensive maneuvers and tactics in case of attack.
  • Operat electronic detection and deception systems.
  • Operat state-of-the-art electronic receivers, signal modifiers, digital recording devices and associated peripherals in collection of airborne, shipborne, and land-based radar signals.
  • Perform in-depth technical analysis of radar signals/systems to produce technical reports and briefs for operational facilities in the United States, Hawaii, Japan, Spain, Great Britain, Australia, and various remote sites throughout the world.
  • Create and maintain technical databases used by local and national level agencies.

Intelligence Specialist (IS)

Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Christopher C. Hippler, left, and Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class Mark Henderson conduct a watch aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77).

Military information, particularly classified information about enemies or potential enemies, is called “intelligence.” Intelligence specialists analyze intelligence data. They break down information to determine its usefulness in military planning. From this intelligence data, they prepare materials that describe in detail the features of strategic and tactical areas all over the world.

The duties performed by ISs include:

  • Analyz intelligence information.
  • Identify and produc intelligence from raw information.
  • Assemble and analyze multi-source operational intelligence.
  • Prepare and present intelligence briefings.
  • Prepare plan materials for photographic reconnaissance missions; analyzing the results, preparing reports.
  • Prepare graphics, overlays and photo/map composites.
  • Plot imagery data using maps and charts.
  • Provide input to and receive data from computerized intelligence systems ashore and afloat.
  • Maintain intelligence databases, libraries and files.

Information Systems Technician (IT)

Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Steven Viar, from Firestone, Colo., tunes a high frequency receiver aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66).

The Information Systems Technician of the 21st century perform core and specialty functions of network administration; install applications and peripherals, troubleshoot user problems, and provide assistance with the use of computer hardware and software.

The duties performed by ITs include:

  • Design, install, operate and maintain state-of-the-art information systems technology including local and wide area networks, mainframe, mini and microcomputer systems and associated peripheral devices.
  • Write programs to handle the collection, manipulation and distribution of data for a wide variety of applications and requirements.
  • Perform the functions of a computer system analyst.
  • Operate and coordinate telecommunications systems including automated networks and the full spectrum of data links and circuits.
  • Transmit, receive, operate, monitor, control and process all forms of telecommunications through various transmission media including global networks.
  • Apply diagnostic, corrective and recovery techniques to all facets of the integrated information systems.
  • Maintain all necessary logs, files and publications at the communications center.
  • Provide telecommunications and computer-related training and assistance to a wide variety of personnel.

Follow the conversation on Twitter – #Warfighting

Learn more about all the enlisted ratings with our Owners and Operators Manual.

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  1. Not Falling For It

    Ok girls, play time’s over. Time to go home and let the men do their jobs.

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